History/Timeline

1912
City Hospital opens with 84 beds and a training school for nurses

1935
Name changes to Greenville General Hospital to reflect the hospital’s expanding mission and capabilities

1947
State Act 432 creates Greenville General Hospital System to serve Greenville County

1952
Greenville General Hospital System becomes one of the nation’s first hospital systems; Allen Bennett Memorial Hospital established to serve Greer area

1956
First medical residency program established at GHS with physicians from the Medical University of South Carolina

1963
40-bed Hillcrest Memorial Hospital opens to serve Mauldin, Simpsonville and Fountain Inn; Roger Huntington Nursing Center opens in Greer

1966
Name changes to Greenville Hospital System; Board of Trustees buys 128-acre site on Grove Road

1967
Ground broken for the first facility on the Grove Road site – Marshall I. Pickens Hospital

1972
Greenville Memorial Hospital and Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital built

1974
Nursing school graduates the last of its 1,654 students

1975
Medical Center Clinics debut; North Greenville Hospital added with 29 beds

1976
Center for Family Medicine, served by the Family Practice Residency Program, opens in the Sirrine building

1977
First Institutional Review Committee created for clinical trials

1978
Cancer Center established

1982
Greenville Memorial Hospital expands to become the state’s largest acute care hospital

1985
Children’s Hospital established

1990
Life Center® Health & Conditioning Club opens in Greenville; Agreement signed with University of South Carolina School of Medicine to train third- and fourth-year medical students here

1994
Children’s Emergency Center opens, the state’s first pediatric ER

1999
Patewood Medical Campus opens

2001
GHS implements nation’s first two-year accredited vascular surgery fellowship; Children’s Hospital Outpatient Center unveiled

2002
500th baby born with the help of GHS’ assisted reproductive technology; agreement signed with Cancer Centers of the Carolinas

2003
New Heart Institute and Children’s Hospital dedicated; Long Term Acute Care Hospital established with 45 beds; 120 acres bought to develop a new Greer campus

2004
Health Sciences South Carolina Collaborative launches with GHS as a founding partner; GHS recognized as a university medical center

2005
Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas expands to GHS; Hillcrest Medical Offices open

2006
GHS goes tobacco free

2007
Five major openings occur: The Cottages at Brushy Creek, 72-bed Patewood Memorial Hospital, Institute for Vascular Health, Institute for Musculoskeletal Health & Wellness and the Greenville HealthCare Simulation Center; GHS receives its largest single gift – $2.5 million from BI-LO® Charities for a children’s cancer center

2008
Greer Memorial Hospital opens with 82 beds; GHS ranks among top 10 public hospital systems based on number of acute care beds

2009
GHS’ assisted reproductive technology lab has the nation’s best “clean room”; for the first time, US News & World Report lists Greenville Memorial Hospital specialties among the country’s top 50; MD360® urgent care center opens

2010
CRNA program debuts at GHS; Medical Experience Academy launched to attract top high school and college students to health fields; new Standards of Behavior center on “compassion”

2011
Studer Group names GHS as Healthcare Organization of the Month; Liaison Committee for Medical Education visits in anticipation of GHS’ plan to expand the University of South Carolina School of Medicine here

2012
GHS celebrates its centennial; University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville opens on the Greenville Memorial Medical Campus

2013
Greenville Hospital System becomes Greenville Health System

2014
GHS’ Greenville Memorial Hospital receives international recognition as a Baby-Friendly birth facility; the GHS Cancer Institute is named one of 34 programs in the nation lauded by the National Cancer Institute as a leader in community-site care delivery and research

2016
GHS’ Greer Memorial Hospital achieves Magnet recognition; GHS transitions from a public, governmental not-for-profit to a private not-for-profit organization. As part of the transition, GHS becomes part of a health company led by the Strategic Coordinating Organization.