Wellness

Category

Breast health blind spots

As we head into October, a cycle of predictable events unfolds. The leaves start to turn, the Clemson University football team revs up its National Championship machine and Breast Cancer Awareness Month arrives. Now, I can’t do anything to make nature’s paintings any better. Nor can I do anything about Clemson’s juggernaut – believe me,...
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Achieve your best health with FUN ways to exercise

If it’s not fun, why do it? While that might be a bit of an overstatement, it’s not far off the attitude we take toward various aspects of life. We expect our work, hobbies, even things like our community involvement to bring us enjoyment. So why is it that so many people have come to...
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Summer, salt and sun

There is a true story that gets circulated among those interested in wilderness medicine of three elderly women who set out on a guided trip down the Colorado river in the Grand Canyon, along with about a dozen other passengers. As expected, they were counseled on the risks of dehydration in the arid desert environment....
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Reading builds strong brains

Literacy – the ability to read and write – is an invaluable skill that affects countless aspects of our day-to-day lives. Strong literacy skills improve informed decision-making, participation in community and overall confidence. We need to learn the ability to read and THEN learn the ability to learn from reading to make a difference in...
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Stroke in the African American community

Stroke is a leading cause of serious, long-term disability in the United States. In South Carolina, African Americans are 43 percent more likely to die from stroke than Caucasians. Young adults are also dying from stroke. Stroke resulted in 16,298 hospitalizations in South Carolina in 2017. Of these, 37 percent were patients younger than 65....
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Immunizations: Keeping your child safe

The safety and efficacy of vaccines has been the subject of a lot of discussion in the news media, especially in light of recent measles outbreaks. Measles is not a mild disease—neither is polio, whooping cough, Hib or pneumococcal meningitis, or rotavirus. These are the kinds of diseases that cause a lot of suffering for...
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Know before you go: Colonoscopy

For a look at what happens before, during and after a colonoscopy, check out this video with Cedrek McFadden, MD, a colorectal surgeon with Prisma Health. Video summary: There are two general reasons why people come to have a colonoscopy: They have symptoms such as bleeding, pain, changes in bowel habits, unexplained weight loss. We...
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Difficult conversations: Aging with grace and accepting the new you

Everything changes – the old neighborhood where we grew up, our work setting, our goals, technology, the people around us – and we change as well. The world around us is changing, and sometimes it is easier to embrace that change than to accept that we have changed. As we grow older, we begin to...
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Breaking down the new mammography standards

Earlier this week, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed changes to mammography standards. These are the first changes to the regulation of mammography screenings in more than 20 years and will improve quality and modernize breast cancer screening. The key changes include providing patients with information about breast density, in the form of...
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Bridge the gap for health care in the minority community

Heart disease, hypertension and diabetes disproportionally affect minority communities in the Upstate and beyond. While many health care systems have focused on helping diverse communities make lifestyle changes to battle these life-threatening diseases, Prisma Health is leading the way in taking another approach to handling these epidemics. We want to address these disparities by inspiring...
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