Our Affiliate System

We are building one organization with affiliates in two regions. Our parent company, now known as Prisma Health, supports both affiliates with overall direction and leadership as we continue to align. We will soon share one brand across the entire organization to better reflect this. The rebranded Palmetto Health-USC Medical Group will continue to operate as a joint venture between the Midlands affiliate and the USC School of Medicine.

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We are becoming Prisma Health in early 2019

Interventional Radiology

No Scalpel Required

Interventional Radiology is a field of medicine that specializes in minimally invasive procedures involving  many parts of the body using imaging guidance such as x-ray, CT and ultrasound. Interventional radiology procedures have been described as essentially surgery without a scalpel.

Interventional radiologists  provide quality care with the least invasive procedures to allow patients a quick recovery. These minimally invasive procedures carry lower risks than surgery, have numerous benefits for patients and have been fine-tuned to be as safe as possible.

Read more about individual procedures and patient recovery below.

How May We Help You?

For additional information or to refer a patient, call (864) 455-4349.

Genito Urinary

This procedure is performed for men with scrotal varicoceles. These can present with problems in fertility and can also be painful. A small catheter is advanced into the neck or leg vein. A 15 to 30 minute procedure involving coiling and plugging the affected vein is performed. The patient is discharged from the hospital later that same day with a small Band-Aid over the puncture site.

This procedure is performed for women with enlarged gonadal veins, with flow in the wrong direction. These can present with problems in fertility and can also be painful, specifically pelvic pain late in the day and pain with intercourse. A small catheter is advanced into the neck or leg vein. A 15 to 30 minutes procedure involving coiling and plugging the affected vein is performed. The patient is discharged from the hospital later that same day with a small Band-Aid over the puncture site.

This procedure is performed to help relieve an obstruction or a leak in the kidney or ureter system. A small tube is placed within the kidney which can offer a portal to intervening on obstructing kidney stones, masses or leaks in the system.

This procedure is performed for lower urinary tract symptoms and benign prostatic hyperplasia. A small catheter is placed in the femoral or radial artery and advanced into the prostate arteries on the right and left sides of the body. Small beads/particles are placed into the prostate arteries which blocks the blood flow to the prostate. The patient is discharged after 24 hours with a small Band-Aid on the leg or the left arm. Over the course of 1 to 3 months, the prostate becomes 50-60% smaller. Overall, patient’s report a 60-70% improvement in quality of life after having this procedure performed.

This procedure is performed in collaboration with the Urology department for renal cell cancers that measure from 1 to 6 cm in size. A small needle is passed into the kidney lesion using ultrasound and/or CT guidance. Biopsies are obtained. Following the biopsy, a small needle or small needles are passed into the kidney lesion. The needles are designed to provide lethal heat or freezing to the lesion. The patient is discharged 24 hours later with a small Band-Aid on the back.

This procedure is performed to help patients that present with painful or infected kidney cysts. First, using ultrasound, x-ray and/or CT guidance, a small tube is placed within the kidney cyst. The fluid or infected material is removed from the cyst. Once the material is removed, sclerosis of the cyst is performed with alcohol or another sclerosing agent so that it will not come back. The patient leaves the hospital the same day the procedure was performed.

Women can present with life threatening or significantly life limiting bleeding. This can occur most commonly from uterine fibroids, but also can occur in association with pregnancy. A small catheter is placed in the femoral or radial artery and advanced into the uterine arteries on the right and left sides of the body. Small beads/particles are placed into the uterine arteries, which blocks the blood flow to the fibroids or abnormal bleeding vessels. The patient is discharged after 24 hours with a small Band-Aid on the leg or the left arm.

Chest

Using CT guidance, a small needle is placed into the patient’s lung lesion so a sample can be obtained and sent to the pathology department for diagnosis. The patient is discharged 2 hours after the procedure after safe confirmation that patient does not have a pneumothorax.

Patients with metastatic or primary disease to the lung can be treated using a small 17-gauge needle. This needle produces significant heat is used to kill abnormal cancer cells. Using CT guidance, lung lesions 1 to 5 cm in size can be successfully treated with microwave ablation. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia. The patient is admitted for 23-hour observation.

Using CT guidance, a small wire is placed within the lung or chest lesion. This helps the surgeon for guidance and minimizes the risks of the operation.

Patient’s with abnormal pulmonary arteries such as fistula or arterial venous malformations are at risk for stroke as well as long-term heart failure. Using a small catheter placed into the leg vein, a plug or coils is advanced and used to block off the abnormal vessel. The patient is discharged from the hospital 24 hours after the procedure with a small Band-Aid on the leg.

Patient’s presenting with hemoptysis, coughing up blood, can be treated by stopping flow to the affected bronchial artery. A catheter is placed in the femoral artery. The bronchial artery is selected and small particles are injected into the affected artery. The blood flow is stopped to the abnormal mass or infection. As a result, the symptoms of hemoptysis/coughing up blood improve.

Bone/Soft tissues

Using CT guidance, a small needle is placed into the patient’s bone lesion or bone marrow so a sample can be obtained and sent to the pathology department for diagnosis. The patient is discharged 2 hours after the procedure.

Patients with cancer can have metastatic disease to the soft tissues or bone. Unfortunately, there can often be significant nerve pain associated with these areas. A small needle can be passed into these areas using CT or US guidance. Lethal hot or cold therapy can be used to kill the tumor in these areas. This treatment can substantially reduce the pain associated with these metastatic or primary lesions. The patient is generally discharged later that same day or early the next morning.

Vascular

Using conscious sedation within the outpatient or inpatient setting, short term or longer term IV catheter access can be provided with the lowest possible cost to the patient.

Patients that have dialysis fistulas or grafts can be seen by our department. In a minimally invasive manner, issues with narrowing or problems with the fistula can be diagnosed and treated.

Patients with clot in the lower extremity veins are at risk for the clot moving to the heart and lungs, creating a life threatening pulmonary embolus. The interventional radiologist can perform a 5 to 10 minute procedure where a filter is placed in the inferior vena cava, blocking the clots on the way to the heart and lungs. Once the patient’s clots resolve in the leg veins, the filter can be removed with a similar 5 to 10 minute procedure.

Patients who have recovered from their acute problem of clotting in the leg veins can be seen in our interventional radiology IVC filter removal clinic, call (864) 455-4349. Both temporary and permanent filters can now be removed to reduce the risk for future clot within the filter or within the lower extremity veins.

Ports can often be used for multiple years for treatment and blood aspiration. If an issue has occurred with the port over time, our department can check the port and often times fix the problem in a minimally invasive manner without the need for removing the existing access.

The interventional radiology team is available around-the-clock for emergency consults involving life-threatening bleeding. Using a small incision in the leg or wrist, a small catheter is advanced into the affected artery in the body. With the use of x-ray, active/life-threatening bleeding can be stopped with coils or plugs with very low risk to the patient. Pseudoaneurysms, aneurysms, AV fistulas, and actively bleeding tumors can be treated in a similar manner. The patient is sent to the floor or ICU with a small Band-Aid on the puncture site.

Patients can be born with or develop abnormal vessels or problems with their lymphatic system. These patients can be at potential risk for stroke, long-term heart failure and infection. These malformations can be treated in a minimally invasive manner using a small needle or catheter along with the use of sclerosing agents. The patient is discharged in the same day of the procedure or the next morning with a small Band-Aid over the puncture site.

Patients can develop problems with their parathyroid gland, adrenal glands, and pituitary glands. Often it is difficult for the surgeons to localize where the abnormality in the gland exists. Using x-ray guidance, the veins from the particular gland can be sampled to give the surgeon the specific location of the abnormality.

Patients that have had clots in the past may have scarred lower extremity veins or even scarring of their main vein to the heart, the inferior vena cava. Using catheters along with the placement of stents, these veins can be opened up to improve blood flow from the legs to the heart. This can markedly improve lower extremity pain and swelling.

Liver

Patients with cirrhosis or scarring of the liver can present with life threatening bleeding from esophageal or gastric varices. They can also develop life limited fluid on the abdomen, known as ascites. A TIPs procedure can be performed under anesthesia to reduce the life threatening elevated pressures in these abnormal veins. The TIPs offers a relief valve to help alleviate the life threatening bleeding or life limiting ascites. Patients stay in the hospital overnight after this procedure.

Patients with metastatic disease to the liver can be treated using a small 17-gauge needle. This needle produces significant heat and gives used to kill abnormal cancer cells. Using CT guidance, liver lesions up to 6 cm in size can be successfully treated with microwave ablation. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia. The patient is admitted for 23-hour observation.

Patients with primary liver cancer as well as metastatic disease to the liver can be treated with chemo embolization. In this procedure, the arterial supply to the tumor is mapped out. Chemotherapy is administered directly into the blood vessels that feed the tumor. The medicine stays within the tumor itself and not having the systemic effects of traditional chemotherapy. This procedure is performed under conscious sedation. The patient is admitted for 23-hour observation.

Patients with primary liver cancer as well as metastatic disease to the liver can be treated with review embolization. In this procedure, the arterial supply to the tumor is mapped out. Radiation is administered directly into the blood vessels that feed the tumor. The medicine stays within the tumor itself and not having the systemic effects of traditional chemotherapy. This procedure is performed in an outpatient setting, with the patient leaving 4 hours after the conclusion of the examination.

Using CT guidance, a small needle is placed into the patient’s liver lesion so a sample can be obtained and sent to the pathology department for diagnosis. The patient is discharged 4 hours after the procedure.

Patients with tumors or malignancy that is localized to one side of the liver can see marked improvement in survival if the disease section of the liver is removed. The interventional radiologist can shut down the blood flow to the affected side of the liver. The procedure is performed with a small catheter in the liver artery or vein. This procedure in turn causes the normal side of the liver to grow and the diseased portion of the liver to get smaller, which makes the surgery safer for the patient.

Patients with cirrhosis or scarring of the liver can present with life threatening bleeding from esophageal or gastric varices. A BRTO procedure can be performed under anesthesia to shut off or embolize the abnormal bleeding veins around the stomach and/or esophagus. Patients stay in the hospital overnight after this procedure.

Patients can present with a stone or a mass obstructing the duct draining bile from the liver to be small bowel. Access can be achieved through the skin to help of the open these ducts. Stones can be removed or a sample of the mass can be obtained for diagnosis. This procedure can also be used to help repair a leak of the biliary system.

Patients can present with an infection within their gallbladder, which can lead to life threatening infection within the blood stream. Often, these patients are too sick for an operation. In this case, CT and ultrasound can be used to direct a small tube to drain the bacteria from the infected gallbladder, which will greatly reduce the risk for life threatening infection.

Gastro Intestinal Tract

Patients with difficulty taking food by mouth often need a tube placed directly into the stomach to maintain nutrition. Using CT or x-ray guidance, a tube can be placed through the abdominal wall within the lumen of the stomach with minimal risks to the patient. This procedure is commonly performed under general anesthesia.

The interventional radiology team is available around-the-clock for emergency consults involving life-threatening bleeding. Using a small incision in the leg or wrist, a small catheter is advanced into the affected artery in the body. With the use of x-ray, active/life-threatening bleeding can be stopped with coils or plugs with very low risk to the patient. The patient is sent to the floor or ICU with a small Band-Aid on the puncture site.

Patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer can now be considered for the RENOVO trial. This trial involves administration of a chemotherapeutic agent directly into the arteries feeding the pancreatic cancer. Patients can leave the hospital the same day as the procedure.

A tube can be advanced from the stomach and into the first portion of the small bowel. This is done under x-ray guidance with minimal risk to the patient.