Our Affiliate System

We are building one organization with affiliates in two regions. Our parent company, now known as Prisma Health, supports both affiliates with overall direction and leadership as we continue to align. We will soon share one brand across the entire organization to better reflect this. The rebranded Palmetto Health-USC Medical Group will continue to operate as a joint venture between the Midlands affiliate and the USC School of Medicine.

Learn more
We are becoming Prisma Health in early 2019

The View – May/June 2017

Volume 68, Issue 3

May/June 2017

Greenville Health System, Palmetto Health Form Partnership

Together, the organization will have the scale, scope and resources required to address the serious health issues—including obesity, diabetes, stroke and other diseases—that plague South Carolinians.

Greenville Health System (GHS) and Palmetto Health recently announced a plan to create a new, not-for-profit S.C. health company. Together, the organization will have the scale, scope and resources required to address the serious health issues—including obesity, diabetes, stroke and other diseases—that plague South Carolinians.

Leadership of the new company will rest with Mike Riordan and Palmetto Health CEO Chuck Beaman. This partnership will bring some changes, but many things will remain the same.

Most important, this partnership does not change the clinician-patient relationship today. In fact, it is intended to enhance this special relationship over time.

We are not combining our medical staffs or clinically integrated networks. Palmetto Health and GHS will retain local control of their provider groups and will continue to be responsible for their own credentialing, privileging and oversight of clinical quality. And we will continue to enhance the collaborative activities between the Midlands and Upstate affiliates that improve clinical quality, the patient experience and healthcare value. Also unchanged will be lease agreements and contractual obligations that the two systems have in place at their respective institutions.

Read more on the new health company at www.SCBetterTogether.org.

Employee of the Year

Doug Dorman, VP of Human Resources, presents Jennifer Cook, RT, with the 2017 Larry M. Greer Stellar Service Award.

During National Healthcare Week in May, Jennifer Cook, radiation therapist, was named GHS Employee of the Year and presented with the Larry M. Greer Stellar Service Award. Each year, GHS honors the employee who has best demonstrated outstanding service over the past 12 months.

According to her manager, “Jenn is an integral part of the team. She is a leading example of improving the patient experience. She brings laughter to a sad situation, comfort during troubled times and an empathetic nature to bring peace to the patients facing one of the scariest words in the English dictionary.”

Cook works with all types of patients. However, she is most known for her work with pediatric patients and the radiation masks she makes for each child. Cook engages with her young patients to learn about their favorite things and then customizes the masks to match their interests. It is not unusual for her to spend up to 30 hours a week of her personal time crafting these unique masks.

She has been with GHS since 2012 when Cancer Centers of the Carolinas joined the system.

LEADERSHIP

As we near the end of this fiscal year, I am grateful for everyone’s hard work and thank you for your ongoing commitment to our patients and their families. You make a difference in the lives of those we serve every day!

President's Report

Goals & Focus for FY 2017: Where do we stand with a quarter left to go?

 As we begin our fourth quarter of FY17, now is a good time to share an update about our Pillar goals. These goals provide an opportunity to measure how well we are doing in supporting the clinician-patient relationship and in continuing to live our mission to heal compassionately, teach innovatively and improve constantly.

All GHS employees can impact these system-level priorities, so let’s work hard to end the year strong. Remember: Green means we are favorable to meeting our goal, yellow means we are near the goal and red means we likely will end up below target. Unless noted otherwise, figures reflect our performance through mid-June.

FY 2017 Organizational Goals & Measures
People: We work to transform health care.
• Employee Opinion Survey Participation Rate: 87%
Achieved: 89% (survey completed in March)
• Wellness Measure: Reduce A1c by 3% in people with diabetes enrolled in Care Coordination Services
Awaiting annual biometric screening results

Experience: We make patients and families the focus of everything we do.
• Inpatient: 75th percentile HCAHPS
Below: -6% (through May)
•  Ambulatory/Physician Practices: 75th percentile CGCAHPS
Below: -55% (through May)
• Emergency Services: 75th percentile
Below: -22% (through May)

Quality: We provide right care at the right time in the right place.
• Zero Harm Measures: Reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) by 20% and reduce Clostridium difficile infections by 15%
For CAUTI—Figure must be at least 17 more cases
For C. diff—Figure must be at least 86 more cases

Quality continued
• Magnet Journey: Achieve Magnet status at Greer Memorial Hospital and schedule a site visit for Greenville Memorial Hospital
Partially achieved: Magnet status at Greer achieved; site visit yet to be scheduled for GMH

Engagement: We partner with many communities to improve health.
Achieve 25% MyChart account activation rate
Favorable by 1%, though number fluctuates daily

Finance: We responsibly direct our resources to support our mission.
• Operating Margin: 1.2%
Favorable by 0.4%
• Total PMPM (per member per month) Spend: Increase by no more than 5.5% over FY16 PMPM costs
Favorable by -$12

Academics: We educate to transform health care.
• Scholarly Activity: 250 peer-reviewed publications, presentations, etc., with GHS identification or attribution
Favorable: Figure must reach at least 65 more
• Conscious Leadership Special Survey: Increase management and staff exposure by 19% over FY16 levels.
Achieved: Figure exceeds 19%

We all have a shared interest in achieving these goals. Results from the People, Experience, Quality, Engagement and Finance pillars will influence the annual employee incentive. The “spotlight” goals—Magnet Status, Total PMPM Spend, Conscious Professionalism Exposure and Wellness Measure—will not factor into the incentive but are key system strategies.

As we near the end of this fiscal year, I am grateful for everyone’s hard work and thank you for your ongoing commitment to our patients and their families. You make a difference in the lives of those we serve every day!

Spence M. Taylor, MD
President

Quick Takes

Hometown: Orlando, Florida

Family: Husband Seth and two children, Carter and Ella Rose

Work/life balance: Spending time with family, traveling, reading and playing golf

Leadership Profile

Saria Saccocio, MD, MHA, Ambulatory Chief Medical Officer and Chair, Department of Family Medicine

An Ambulatory CMO advocates for medical professionals who work on the front lines in ambulatory medical care. This senior-level administrative position makes sure that frontline providers and staff have the operational foundation they need to deliver personalized, high-quality care.

Saria Saccocio, MD, MHA, joined GHS in May as its first Ambulatory CMO and the new chair of the Department of Family Medicine. She brings years of experience as an administrator and academic program director. Above all, she shares a passion for providing a diversity of care to individuals and families.

“I chose to become a family medicine physician because of the diversity in care that we offer,” said Dr. Saccocio. “The opportunity to treat patients and serve families through all phases of life is fun and rewarding, and the diversity in their care keeps life interesting.”

Dr. Saccocio was drawn to GHS by its vision: We transform health care for the people and communities we serve. “This vision is directly in line with my philosophy as a family medicine physician and a physician in general,” she explained. “Every person should be cared for as a VIP—very important person—and treated like family. And transforming how we deliver health care for the community through innovation and healing compassionately—that’s the ultimate family physician job.”

She continued, “Patients and their families expect three things from us: Heal them, don’t harm them, and treat them with respect and kindness. These expectations are not only reasonable, but also anything less would seem unacceptable.”

The Department of Family Medicine is committed to transforming health care for the people and communities we serve. As Dr. Saccocio noted, “The quadruple aim is our compass: improving patient outcomes, lowering the cost of care, improving the patient experience and improving clinician experience.”

She cited examples of ways GHS is moving forward in these goals: “Engaging in MyHealth First Network allows for greater focus on high-quality performance and cost efficiency. Exploring tools that provide real-time patient feedback will help us identify practical opportunities to improve the patient experience. And through innovative delivery models like Team Care, we can lessen the administrative barriers to the patient-clinician relationship—ideally bringing joy back to practicing medicine.”

 

“Every person should be cared for as a VIP—very important person—and treated like family.”

LEADING THE WAY

Map Connects People and Resources

As part of GHS’ Commitment to Excellence, we partner with many communities to improve health. That includes working with community agencies and our academic partners to enhance services that ultimately lead to healthier populations across our region.

GHS, Greenville County, Furman University, United Way of Greenville County, and 2-1-1 have teamed to create a map of essential services.

Recently, officials with GHS, Greenville County, Furman University, United Way of Greenville County and 2-1-1  unveiled “imap,” a community information resource that provides users an interactive look at essential services available throughout Greenville County.

“Our goal with imap is to increase community members’ awareness of and convenience of access to essential life services such as food, housing, health care and even recreational opportunities in Greenville County,” said Shannon Herman, assistant county administrator of Strategic Advancement for Greenville County.

“Being able to identify where there is little or no access to healthcare services, for example, enables us to make better, more informed decisions about where and how we allocate our resources,” explained Jennifer Snow, director of Accountable Communities at GHS.

“The insight gleaned from this map is invaluable as we work together with our partners to meet the healthcare needs of the greater Greenville community.”
—Jennifer Snow, director, GHS Accountable Communities

Officials said imap also can be used by decision-makers such as health and public safety officials and county planners, or by private businesses and residents to analyze distribution of community assets and service areas to identify where services need to be added or enhanced.

The map was developed by Greenville County with help from students and professors at Furman University. Together, the team spent months meeting with local organizations to identify essential services across the county and then used geocoding—an automated process that compares a list of addresses against a database to calculate coordinates—to plot 1,000+ individual services.

“The community information map exemplifies Furman’s philosophy of integrating hands-on, high-impact collaborative experiences as part of our students’ education,” stated Charles Davis, PhD, MBA, first gentleman at Furman University and a member of the United Way Board of Trustees.

Davis continued, “Throughout this process, our students have been able to learn from and collaborate with community leaders, while also helping to develop an innovative tool that will benefit the health and well-being of the greater Greenville community. This is The Furman Advantage, the engaged learning experience we promise our students.”

During the testing phase, partners saw some positive results. For example, an agency that helps the homeless was able to tell a young mother about childcare options close to her home, while a library staff member connected a homebound resident to a local food pantry. Local realtors have even used the map to show buyers services near properties of interest.

“When people feel empowered to seek out and obtain the services they need to succeed, good things happen,” noted Richard LaPratt, executive VP of Contact Center Services for 2-1-1. “We see numerous stories of success every year through 2-1-1, and we believe the same results are possible with imap.”

“We all want Greenville County to be a thriving community where everyone can have a safe, stable and successful life,” added United Way Board Chair Michael Cinquemani. “The community information map is yet another valuable tool in our quest to make Greenville County a place where everyone has the opportunities and resources to reach their full potential.”

To access imap, visit the United Way of Greenville County’s website or go to www.greenvilleimap.com.

QUALITY

Skilled Nursing and Rehab–Laurens Shines

In April, GHS Skilled Nursing and Rehab-Laurens, part of Laurens County Medical Campus, earned 5 stars from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. This top rating is based on health and fire safety reviews, facility and RN staffing, and quality measures.

The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control visits all licensed nursing homes in the state to gauge compliance with state and federal regulations. These visits consist of in-depth chart reviews, patient and staff interviews, and a fire and life safety inspection. The new inspection format—called the Quality Indicator Survey—consists of an off-site review before visiting the facility, unannounced on-site review and off-site final review based on information obtained throughout the survey process.

All certified Medicare and Medicaid  nursing home facilities must submit clinical information through the Minimum Data Set (MDS). The MDS provides a comprehensive assessment for each resident’s functional ability and identifies current health problems. This information allows facilities to tailor a care plan for each patient. Through the MDS, quality measure data are captured so that the facility can be reimbursed for the care offered.

Sitting (l-r): Teresa Nabors, RN; Beth Batson, ADC; standing (l-r): Hailey Wilson, LBSW; Cole Brown, MHA, NHA; and Renea Crase, RN.

Learn more at the Nursing Home Compare website.

STELLAR SERVICE

Stellar Service

May

Delphine Skelton, CNA, Med-Surg/OMH, helped return a patient’s precious memento. While in the hospital, a small prayer cloth the patient had kept pinned to her hospital gown was lost. Skelton found the cloth in the clean linens soon after the patient was discharged. She immediately contacted her supervisor who wrote in Skelton’s nomination: “She is a shining light to all in her presence and stellar role model to her peers.”

Letorra Johnson, RN, Med-Renal/GMH, was leaving after her shift when she saw a family member standing anxiously outside a patient’s room. Johnson stopped to see how she could help. The patient had an occluded IV and a full bedpan. She calmly assessed the situation and made sure the patient’s needs were met. “She showed exceptional humanity and professionalism,” wrote the patient’s spouse.

Kalisha Williams, OT Assistant/LCMH, helped a withdrawn patient in the skilled nursing facility become motivated and outgoing. When she learned the patient could not read, she began to spend her spare time helping him become literate. She brought materials and tools and encouraged every small step. As he grew more confident in his reading, he became a more motivated and outgoing patient.

June

Amber Blackwell, Chaplain, Pastoral Care/GMH, touched the heart of a grieving family member by creating a touching memorial keepsake. “She was so caring to take all the pictures and make us such a beautiful shadowbox to take home,” wrote the grateful family member. “She wanted to make everything perfect for us. Thank you so much for your compassion!”

Holly Munson, MD, Rural Medicine Residency PGY 3/OMH, helped calm an elderly patient whose dog had been taken to an animal shelter. The patient lived alone and could no longer care for her beloved companion. Dr. Munson adopted the dog, which gave the patient peace of mind that her pet would be well cared for.

No photo available

Pam Beason, RN, The Family Birthplace/GMH, helped a patient in the ICU see her mom when she needed her most. Beason was performing an NST (screening test to monitor fetal heart rate) before the patient could be intubated. The patient desperately wanted to see her mom, who was waiting in the car with a grandson. Beason brought the mom to the patient and sat with the little boy.

Volunteers of the Month

Edith Sellars is the Volunteer of the Month for May. She has amassed a total of 3,708 hours in her seven years volunteering with the LCMH Auxiliary. Sellars willingly comes in for other volunteers when needed and primarily works at the Front Information Desk. She also participates in numerous Auxiliary projects that support the community, such as making homemade goods for bake sales and purchasing items for gift bags for those in need.

Edgar Huler is the Volunteer of the Month for June. Known for his wit and humor, Huler has actively volunteered on Greenville Memorial Medical Campus since 2010. He works each week at the Surgery Information Desk at GMH updating family members on their loved one’s status and escorting them to the recovery room. A retired medical practice manager, he brings years of experience and compassion to the surgical waiting room.

Standard of the Month

Communicate Professionally

Greenville Health System’s value statement—Together we serve with integrity, respect, trust and openness—underscores the importance of clear communication and reflects the first of our Compassion Standards of Behavior: Communicate Professionally. 

How we interact with patients, families, co-workers, other departments and customers sets the tone not only for service excellence, but also for ensuring effective, efficient, high-quality performance systemwide.

Feedback is a powerful, positive tool. From rounding with patients and staff to holding team huddles at shift change, face-to-face interaction can stimulate ideas, confirm information is accurate and resolve confusion in a short time.

Learn more about communicating professionally here.

Kudos

Matthew Bitner, MD, GHS Emergency Medicine, has been elected to serve on the board of the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP). SC ACEP supports the availability of high-quality emergency medical services to all patients within the state. The local chapter represents more than 340 emergency physicians, residents and medical students working at hospitals statewide. Page Bridges, MD, GHS Emergency Medicine, also serves on this board.

Howell Clyborne, VP of Community and Governmental Affairs and Chief of Staff, has been named president of Greenville Health Authority (GHA), the public, governmental arm of GHS. This public entity is responsible for overseeing the lease agreement between the GHA Board of Trustees and GHS Board of Directors, assessing community need and administering an $80 million community fund to improve the health of the Greenville community.

David Forstein, DO, FACOOG, (Dist), has received the Distinguished Service Award by the American College of Osteopathic Obstetricians and Gynecologists. This honor recognizes outstanding contributions to the profession, specialty and community.

Daniel Smith Jr., MD, medical director, Hospice of the Foothills and Cottingham Hospice House, received the Lewis Blackman Patient Safety Champion Award during the annual Transforming Health Symposium in Columbia in April. Dr. Smith was honored for his work to develop a continuum of care for patients in need of palliative and hospice services, resulting in the first comprehensive inpatient and outpatient palliative care program in the region.

Christen Hairston, PhD, director of Student Affairs and Pipeline Programs for GHS Health Sciences Center, was selected for the 2017 CDC Science Ambassador Fellowship, a program that equips educators to bring public health curricula to middle and high school students. This fellowship will allow Dr. Hairston to expand her health sciences initiatives with Carolina High School and other local educational endeavors.

 

 

Sara Roman, Jennifer Strickland, Tanika Dillard and Chris Campen represented the Cancer Institute’s Blood and Marrow Transplant Program during recent meetings of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplant and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Registry. Roman and Strickland were invited to deliver oral presentations, while Dillard and Campen submitted poster presentations selected for display.

GHS Division of Pediatric Endocrinology received the “Community Champions” award at the Greenville JDRF Diabetes Foundation in March. This award typically is given to an individual or family, rarely to a medical unit.

GHS Department of Marketing & Communications received two awards from the Academy of Interactive & Visual Arts: Award of Excellence, the Academy’s highest honor, for the “Exercise Is Medicine: Launch Video,” and Award of Distinction, which recognizes projects that exceed industry standards in quality and achievement, for GHS 360 News.

GHS is among 11 hospitals and health systems to receive the ECRI Institute 2017 Healthcare Supply Chain Achievement Award. This honor recognizes healthcare organizations for excellence in balancing cost, quality and outcomes. This year’s winners were selected from nearly 3,000 members nationwide.

Congratulations, Pharmacy Residency Grads!

Congratulations to the following graduates of the 2016-17 GHS Pharmacy Residency Programs: Front row (l-r): PGY1 grads Brittany Wills, PharmD; Sarah Joseph, PharmD; and Caroline Cruce, PharmD; back row (l-r): Lucy Crosby, PharmD, PGY1 program director; PGY1grads Patrick Walker, PharmD, and Chance Wachholtz, PharmD; PGY2 grad Michael Wagner, PharmD; and Doug Furmanek, PharmD, PGY2 program director.

In addition, residents awarded Jessica Odom, PharmD, and Matt Parker, PharmD, as Preceptors of the Year. Their names will be included on a plaque displayed in the pharmacy administration offices.

 

AROUND THE SYSTEM

Enhance Your Research Skills

Public Health Sciences at Clemson University, in collaboration with GHS, offers the Clinical and Translational Research Certificate program. This graduate-level program builds research competency among GHS clinicians, research support staff and other health professionals.

The next class begins mid-August. Learn more or apply here. Questions? Email Ron Gimbel, PhD, rgimbel@clemson.edu; David Cull, MD, Dcull@ghs.org; or Joy Green-Hadden, JGreenHadden@ghs.org.

Congratulations to these recent graduates of the Clinical and Translational Research Certificate program! (l-r): Michael Cooter, MD, ENT; Smitty Heavner, Nursing; Susan Bethel, Nursing Research; Fanny Guillerminet, PhD, Neurology Research; Lorna Lasure, MBA, Pediatrics Research; Phillip Moschella, MD, PhD, Emergency Department; and Steven Ma, MD, Pediatrics Fellow. Not present but represented on laptops: (l-r) Brian McKinley, MD, Surgery, and Alan Leahey, MD, Ophthalmology.

GHS Steps Up for March of Dimes

Departments and practices across GHS sponsored creative ways to raise money for the 2017 March of Dimes’ March for Babies campaign:

Pucker Up
In just their second year of raising funds for March for Babies, Internal Medicine Clinic staff raised nearly $1,200, a whopping $934.44 from their “Kiss the Pig” contest. Clinic physician Darion Showell, MD (in photo), and RN Sharon Warday received the most nominations for the honor of kissing Layla, IM clinic nurse Beth Garner’s pot-bellied pig.

Signed, Sealed, Delivered
Respiratory Care Services of Children’s Hospital sponsored a drawing for a national championship football autographed by Clemson University football coach Dabo Swinney. Congratulations to winner David Sudduth, VP, COO, Health Sciences Center, and long-time Tigers fan. 

Global Giving

In May, the GHS employee resource group African American Network (AAN) hosted a presentation by Tutudesk Campaign at USC School of Medicine Greenville. The event launched the group’s outreach project to provide 1,000 portable desks for a school near Johannesburg, South Africa.

(center) Bobbie Rhodes, RN, organizational development consultant, Learning and Development, and chair, AAN Community Outreach; with (l-r) Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe and Mapitso Rivera from Tutudesk Campaign.

The Tutudesk Campaign is an initiative of the United Nations’ goal to increase literacy in developing countries. Learn more.

AAN invites all employees to join this effort. To donate, go to www.tutudesk.org. In instructions to seller, type Tutudesk/GHS. Or send cash or check to the GHS Diversity Department (payable to Frederick Douglass Families Initiatives Tutudesk/GHS). Questions? Contact Bobbie Rhodes at brhodes@ghs.org or (864) 455-1426.

Supporting Our Troops

GHS assisted the Greenville chapter of Blue Star Mothers and Girl Scout Troop 4612 as they collected and prepared to mail hundreds of Girl Scout cookies to servicemen and women worldwide. GHS provided a truck to deliver individual boxed assortments of cookies to the Orchard Park post office.

Library Update

The Health Sciences Library and Library Commons serve all staff, students and faculty of GHS and USC School of Medicine Greenville. The library delivers services and resources for answering patient care questions at point of clinical care, provides comprehensive literature reviews for process improvement and research, and offers unique educational opportunities to facilitate learning. Here are highlights from the library’s 2016 annual report:
• Provided instruction to more than 1,100 students throughout GHS and USC School of Medicine Greenville
• Conducted searches for over 1,400 topics—40% more than last year
• Answered 1,000+ reference questions—11% more than last year
• Reported top usage of electronic resources at 725,000—an increase of 44%
• Delivered more than 6,500 journal articles to patrons

Take advantage of these library services and resources:
• Free, in-depth search service
• Email delivery of needed journal articles
• Library instruction for groups and individuals
• UpToDate, a resource for answers to questions at the point of clinical care (now accessible through Epic)
• ClinicalKey—gain access to over 1,000 books, 500 journals and six million images

Contact library@ghs.org or (864) 455-7176 to request assistance.

Nursing Excellence

GHS Nursing Improves Constantly Through Data Analysis

Our GHS mission is heal compassionately, teach innovatively and improve constantly.

Nursing at GHS improves constantly by monitoring structures provided for patient care, processes that affect patient care and outcomes of patient care.  One structural quality indicator is the percentage of nurses with a BSN degree (or higher). Research shows that an increase in the percentage of BSN-prepared nurses is associated with improved patient outcomes. At GHS, an action plan is in place to increase the number of nurses with BSN degrees to 80% by 2020.

Process quality indicators measure the steps in a process that improve patient outcomes. For example, nurses gauge patients’ risk for hospital-acquired pressure injury. We also monitor nursing interventions based on that assessment, such as nutritional support, routine repositioning of the patient and moisture prevention.

Nurse-sensitive outcome quality indicators measure outcomes of the patient care provided. Examples include hospital-acquired pressure injuries, patient injury rate from falls, hospital-acquired infections and patient satisfaction with the care delivered.

Nursing also monitors GHS’ quality in comparison to national averages through participation in various databases. Data gathered by nurses across GHS are compared to data from thousands of similar hospitals, providing a benchmark or goal. Based on continuous monitoring of data related to patient care, we implement actions for enhancement when indicated and continue to monitor quality to evaluate the successful improvement of patient outcomes.

Our mission to improve constantly aligns with the Magnet® Recognition Program of the American Nurses Credentialing Center for excellence in nursing care. Some GHS hospitals are at various stages in a journey toward Magnet designation, which supports improvement in nursing care delivery, nursing knowledge and evidence-based clinical quality.

Anne Greer, MSN, RN, Nursing Quality Analyst

References: Aiken LH, Cimiotti JP, Sloane DM. Effects of Nurse Staffing and Nurse Education on Patient Deaths in Hospitals with Different Work Environments. Med Care. 2011 Dec; 49(12):1047-53.

 

2017 GHS Nursing Excellence Awards

Nursing Excellence Award winners were announced during National Nurses Week in May. Recipients of these peer-nominated awards excel at promoting and advancing their profession; display caring and commitment to patients, families and co-workers; and demonstrate leadership in the profession and at GHS. Awards cover four categories: inpatient, outpatient, specialty role or area, and leadership.

Central Region
Greenville Memorial Medical Campus
Jeff Inks, ADN, RN: Inpatient
Pam Wrobel, BSN, RN: Outpatient
Chris Costello, BSN, RN, CWON: Specialty
Michelle Stancil, BSN, RN, CDE: Leadership
Patewood Medical Campus
Jennifer Brooks, RN, BSN, CNOR: Inpatient
Cherryll Fae Smith, RN, BSN, CWCN, CFCN: Outpatient
Sandy Turner, RN, BSN, CNOR: Specialty
Susan Martin, RN, BSN: Leadership

Simpsonville Medical Campus
Brenda Bouchard, RN, BSN: Inpatient
Nicholas Cullen, RN: Outpatient
Heather Garrison, RN, BSN, CPN, CPEN: Specialty
Paige Snow, MSN, RN, CNOR: Leadership

North Greenville Medical Campus*
Emily Farr, RN, BSN: Inpatient
Heather Garrett, RN: Outpatient
Cassie Mueller, RN, BSN, MSN: Leadership
Gregory Hair, RN, BSN: Leadership
*NGH has no specialty but two leadership awards

Eastern Region
Lynn Dobbs, RN, BSN: Ambulatory Nursing
LeAnn Malone, RN, BSN: Inpatient
Tammy Henson, RN, BSN: Outpatient
Reuben Diachenko, RN, BSN, CEN: Specialty
Annie Trout, RN, MSN, NE-BC, CNOR: Leadership

Southern Region
Charlene Moore, RN, ADN: Inpatient
Katie Lawson, RN, BSN: Outpatient
Angela Godfrey, RN, BSN: Specialty
Kia McKnight, RN, BSN: Leadership

Western Region
Mary K. Bowser, RNC, MSN: Inpatient
Ginger O’Kelley, RN, ADN: Outpatient
Robin Powell, RN, ADN, CDE: Specialty
Brenda Fuller, RN, ADN: Leadership

Palmetto Gold Nursing Awards

Congratulations to GHS’ 2017 Palmetto Gold nominees: Angela Bron, BSN, RN; Carl Cromer, MSN, RN, CPEN; Matthew DeJong, BSN, RN; Jeffery Everett, BSN, RN, PCCN; June Ross, BSN, RN; Jennifer Slatton, BSN, RN; Joanna Travaglini, BSN, RN; and Alicia Watson, BSN, RN.

Everett and Travaglini received awards this year at the 16th annual Palmetto Gold Gala. Each year, 100 nurses from across S.C. receive this prestigious award for exemplifying excellence in nursing and showing a commitment to the profession.

(l-r) Jeffery Everett; Annie Trout, nurse manager,
with winner Joanna Travaglini.

May Service Anniversaries

45 Years
Karen McIntyre

40 Years
Janice Stewart

35 Years
Charlene Davis
Penny Evans
John Tate

30 Years
Dianne Gambrell
Tina Hogan
Kristina Moore
Virginia Reeves
Lori Stephens

25 Years
William Deeter
Marie Keener
Nancy Wilburn

20 Years
Patricia Butler
Michelle Davis
Tina Davis
Karen Dimatteo
Dawn Godfrey
Jennifer Hilson
Kristin Humphrey
Tom Kelley
Virginia Knight
Karen Mahon
Bobby McDavid
John Millon
Marian Robinson
Cindy Rollins
Asheda Sanders
Jean Wright

15 Years
Sandy Barber
Britt Barfield
Melissa Brown
Tiffany Chappell

Chris Deane
Eric Farnsworth
Deborah Kelly
Ilona Lungui
Ashley Nguyen
Brenda Pace
Patsy Watkins
Liz White

10 Years
Quintoria Brockman
Deanne Brupbacher
Donald Clark
Chris Clemow
Joyce Cook
Steve Franks
Sue Glunt
Heather Goss
Sherry Harmon
Natasha Hipp
Janice Holbrook

Begona Hughes
Joni Hughey
Cicley Hunter
Tylisha Jackson
Veronica Kershaw
Janis Kilgore
Pat Konstant
Stephanie Leonard
Catherine Massey
Jennifer Mauro
Thomas Moore
Mark Price
Fatima Roushdy
Stacey Sellers
Laketa Smith
Dorothy Starnes
Sharon Stepp
Susan Stevens
Tamara Stovall
Vanessa Talley
Jimmy Vaughn
Angela West
Kerri Wham

5 Years
Cyndi Wolfe
Debbie Berry
Beth Black
Tom Blackwell
Alice Bouchillon
Gina Brown
Sabrina Bryant
Dafaney Buford
Ashley Burkhalter
Maria Burton
Lori Caldwell
Justin Campbell
Maria Chandler
Sylvia Davis
Nidia Fonseca
Jonatan Garcia
Levi Hannah
Tasha Jackson
Tammy Jamerson
Dayna Jordan
Christopher Kelly
Doreen Laubsch

Jennifer Marshall
Monica McDowell
Tammy Mills
Ashley Morrow
Nadine Mulligan
Terri Neves
Gina Nicholson
Wendy Nix
Tina Owens
Kathy Pettit
Aleksandra Phillips
Connie Posey
L’Oreal Pressley
Holly Reynolds
Tiffani Sloan
Patti Stawaisz
Connie Sutter White
Kelsey Tallon
Amasendra Thompson
Treva Valentine
Marlee White
Beth Windsor

June Service Anniversaries

40 Years
Susan McConnell
Wayne Mosteller
Pat Simmons

35 Years
Larry Bowman
Joyce Griffin
Jo Beth Messick
Louise Moon
Gina Norris
Jill Taylor
Jan Wilson

30 Years
Paul Catalana
Alison Evans
Donna Fowler
Allison Horton
Mary Johnson
Sharon Lemere
Letha Mustafa
Joyce Raiden
Sara Taylor

25 Years
Scott Beane
Renee Duncan
Terry Fuller
Tamela Gallman-Keller

Nancy Henderson
Larry Hill
Robin LaCroix
Sandy Majka
Sherri O’Kelley
Dianne Patterson
Cecilia Smith

20 Years
Melinda Ault-Higginbotham
Macio Clay
David Cull
Kelley Duncan
Jean Elrod
Wendy Fischer
Gerry Hendricks
Michelle Horne
Jennifer Hudson
Teri Middleton
Debbie Paden Mobley
Pamela Moss
Hae Kyong Nelson
Delores Pitts
Mitzi Privette
Marsha Ridlehuber
John Schrank
Louie Shirley
Bruce Snyder
Nancy Song

15 Years
Joan Arnold
Rhonda Campbell
April Dodson
Lavell Finley
Jonathan Frazier
Rewa Gist
Debra Hill
Heather Hooper
Stephanie Hoopes
Craig Hudak
Sheri Johnston
Brianna Keith
Dylan Lawlor
Elijah Martin
Gretchen Martin
Christy McJunkin
Allyson Sicilia
Cindi Styles
Wesley Walters
Susan Weninger
Charlene Zhao

10 Years
Linda Bailey
Heather Barwick
Lisa Cash
Jennifer Chapla
Ruthie Cureton
Jodi Currin
Dawn Czarnecki

Fran Derrick
Ashley Doyle
Stacey Elam
Kathy Enslin
Patricia Flynn
Julie Fortson
Beth Godwin
Lisa Griffith
Matt Grisham
Corinne Hovda
Malcolm Isley
Carol Land
Peggy Lee
Anne Long
Charlene Mason
Angela McCreery
Glenda McKinney
Kia McKnight
Emily Merrell
Kelli Moxie
Andrea Nesbit
Heather Norris
Kathy Oakley
Jessica Odom
Amanda O’Kelly
Kim Osborn
Brenda Painter
Micah Phillips
Chrystal Prater
Tracey Pringle
KC Rawlings
Ashley Reed
Tracy Richardson

Kelly Rodriguez
Jamie Rogers
Chuck Sanders
Larae Sanfilippo
Becky Sawyer
Adam Scher
Gretchen Shuler
Joanne Skaggs
Cindy Thomas
Josh Welborn
Glenn Wert
Miranda Worster
Gail Wright

5 Years
Arely Arauz
Denise Avery-Dodd
Stephanie Bailey
Marsha Bennett
Sheila Bigner
Liz Bigott
Marsha Blust
Dee Brown
George Brown
Andrew Burgess
Shannon Burgess
Alyson Burns
Tara Cancellaro
Liz Dewald
Robert Fowler
Amanda Freeman
Sheena Gamble
Liatonia Glenn

Dianna Gurich
Jennifer Harling
Michael Henderson
Kristi Hooper
Angela Kelly
Audre Auna Kennedy
Kelly Kirby
Andrew Knecht
Noorez Lalani
Donnie Leland
Debbie McCarley
Kim McLeroy
Monique Means
Cory Mitchell
Donna Murphy
Ermira Parker
Derek Pennington
Janoy Ravelo
Lindsay Reulbach
Kirby Reynolds
Rachel Roach
Nicki Rush
Lisa Schickler
Elizabeth Shirley
Michelle Stancil
Brad Stehl
Matt Stroud
Craig Thompson
Matthew Vana
Teresa Williams
Leigh Wise

Upcoming Events

Let’s Get Curious!
June 3-Sept. 24—Upcountry History Museum. The insatiable curiosity of Curious George comes to life through a special exhibition sponsored by GHS. Learn more at www.upcountryhistory.org.

 Farmers Markets
GHS sponsors the weekly TD Saturday Market and its Spuds & Sprouts program for children in downtown Greenville, as well as the Fountain Inn Farmers Market in Commerce Park. Both markets are open Saturdays from 8 a.m.-noon.  

Is Weight-loss Surgery for You?
Learn from GHS bariatric surgeons what may be the best weight-loss option for you on Tuesdays, 1 p.m., and Wednesdays, 9 a.m., at 2104 Woodruff Road. Free; registration required. Call 676-1072. 

Healthy Way
This free nutrition class focuses on creating positive nutrition changes for cancer survivors and takes place Thursdays, 3:30-4:30 p.m., at the GHS Cancer Institute. To register, call 455-2862.

Support Groups

Diabetes
This free group meets the second Monday monthly, 6-7:30 p.m., at the GHS Life Center®. For more information, call 455-4025.

Tobacco Cessation
This free group meets Tuesdays at 6 p.m. in the Community Room at Patewood Memorial Hospital. For more information, call 455-7737.

Weight Management
This free group meets Thursdays, 5-6:30 p.m., at GHS Life Center. For more information, call 522-3144.

Bereavement Support
GHS Hospice of the Foothills offers bereavement support and education to the community. Dates, times and locations vary. To learn more, call 882-8940.

Save the Date!

GHS Night at the Drive
Aug. 30—Fluor Field. Join us for this fun event at the Greenville Drive celebrating GHS employees and their families.

 JDRF ONE WALK
Sept. 16—BMW Performance Center. Help support research to fight type 1 diabetes and walk with Team GHS in the JDRF ONE walk. Learn more here.

See a full list of GHS classes and events at www.ghs.org/events.

Community Connections

GHS employees and the community members got on their feet this spring to promote healthy living and healthy babies. Here are just a few examples:

Walk with a Doc

In honor of Minority Health Month, GHS hosted “Walk with a Doc.” This fun, family-friendly event for all ages and abilities promoted exercise for reducing risk for diseases like stroke heart disease and diabetes. The event took place on the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail and was led by GHS physicians Leon Buffaloe, MD; Dana Ray, MD; and Scott Sasser, MD.

March for Babies

GHS turned out in force May 6 for Greenville 2017 March of Dimes March for Babies.

GHS Swamp Rabbit 5K

Despite the threat of rain, approximately 5,000 people turned out May 5 for the 2017 Swamp Rabbit 5K, a premiere family-friendly fun event!

… and quite a few people got their feet wet for a great cause …

2017 Dragon Boat Upstate Festival

Thanks to the individuals who gave and to the teams that raced in the 2017 Dragon Boat Upstate Festival. Their efforts amassed over $300,000 to support cancer research, patients and their families!

To report news, email ghsnews@ghs.org

Meredith McGinnis, Editor

Connect with us. Learn what’s going on at GHS.
Access The View on the Employee Access page at ghs.org
and the News and Communication page on Plexus