Our Affiliate System

We are building one organization with affiliates in two regions. Our parent company, now known as Prisma Health, supports both affiliates with overall direction and leadership as we continue to align. We will soon share one brand across the entire organization to better reflect this. The rebranded Palmetto Health-USC Medical Group will continue to operate as a joint venture between the Midlands affiliate and the USC School of Medicine.

Learn more
We are becoming Prisma Health in early 2019

The View – July/August/September 2017

Volume 68, Issue 4

July/August/September 2017

GHS Health Sciences Center

 HSC is dedicated to helping health professionals of today and tomorrow meet real-world needs of our community by providing leadership and a clinical environment for over 40 academic professional and workforce development programs. Learn more

The GHS Employee as Student
Find out how GHS supports employees in furthering their education.

In 2016, Greenville Health System (GHS) established the Health Sciences Center (HSC), an LLC created in partnership with University of South Carolina, Clemson University and Furman University. Together, these entities work to pave the way for breakthroughs in healthcare delivery, access and affordability.

Each year, 5,000+ medical learners receive part of their academic and clinical training at GHS. Many return to work and practice at GHS facilities. HSC was created to oversee and manage all aspects of our teaching, workforce development, research, philanthropy and entrepreneurial activities.

If you think about a tricycle, patient care is the big wheel in the front; education and research are the twin wheels in the back supporting that wheel. This tricycle model has been GHS’ focus for over 100 years. HSC gives this philosophy a focused, strategic approach that keeps patients in the forefront of our vision and mission for generations to come.

The HSC is a unique opportunity for GHS to lead the transformation in health care, higher education, philanthropy and economic development while creating better lives for the people of South Carolina.

Over the last nine months, HSC board of managers and leadership have created the groundwork for managing and overseeing this partnership by establishing these primary areas of focus:

  • Manage and expand the GHS clinical learning environment
  • Sponsor graduate medical education
  • Oversee business and economic development and entrepreneurial opportunities
  • Develop and implement a new model of philanthropy to support education and research
  • Promote equity and inclusion

Two stories in this issue of The View reflect HSC’s focus. In our Leadership Profile, Camiron Pfennig, MD, MHPE, program director for Emergency Medicine Residency, GHS’ newest graduate medical program, explains how this new program benefits GHS and the communities we serve.

Our Leading the Way story highlights collaborations with Furman University that seek to reduce barriers in accessing medical care and that target non-medical issues that can create and worsen the health of vulnerable populations.

HSC Zeroes in on Diabetes

 HSC supports innovative ideas, interprofessional education and interdisciplinary research. 

HSC has targeted diabetes as its first foundational focus for improving health in our communities. This devastating disease and its complications affect one of 10 people in the Upstate.

  • South Carolina ranks 10th highest in the nation in the percent of population with diabetes
  • Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the state
  • Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to many complications including blindness, kidney failure, heart attack, stroke and amputation

The good news is those with diabetes can live long, healthy lives when their disease is properly managed. But controlling diabetes is hard to do when multiple factors prevent access to care and inhibit commitment to self-management.

GHS has been a leader in diabetes research, treatment and self-management. HSC partners will build on such expertise as they launch this initiative to support innovative ideas, interprofessional education and interdisciplinary research to prevent diabetes, reduce diabetes complications and help people better manage this disease.

LEADERSHIP

 Through our academic mission—teach innovatively—we can fulfill our promise to enhance lives and provide high-quality health care for generations to come.

President's Report

On January 10, 1912, Greenville opened City Hospital—the beginning of Greenville Health System. Three days later, the City Hospital Training School for Nurses was founded. These events set the course for an emphasis on academics that has been integral to fulfilling our mission for more than a century.

Over the past eight years, the system’s academic vision has evolved to become GHS Health Sciences Center. In collaboration with primary academic and research partners Clemson University, Furman University and the University of South Carolina.

GHS now is home to over 40 academic professional and workforce development programs, a medical school, a nursing program, clinical and translational research, and the region’s largest healthcare delivery system.

Why is this important? Why are we so committed to academics at GHS? The answer is simple: Through our academic mission—teach innovatively—we can fulfill our promise to enhance lives and provide high-quality health care for generations to come.

Our programs build pipelines for a future healthcare workforce and allow us to train, retain and recruit the best healthcare professionals. And, as one of only 100 nationally designated academic health centers, GHS is positioned to innovate patient care and transform the communities we serve.

Unlike most hospitals and health systems, academic health centers are teaching environments that provide a range of care from routine to highly complex, develop new technologies and treatments, offer patients first-in-region access to clinical trials, conduct research and positively impact the economy. In fact, one in 40 wage earners works directly or indirectly for a medical school or teaching hospital, according to the Association of Academic Health Centers.

Ultimately, our commitment to academics allows us to broaden, strengthen and perpetuate the impact we make in the Upstate. It will ensure that GHS continues to serve our patients and communities for at least another 100 years.

Spence M. Taylor, MD
President

Quick Takes

Hometown: Carmel, Indiana

Family: Spouse David Bass (employed in Information Services) and newborn Harper Grace Bass—who arrived September 19, 2017!

Work/life balance: Endurance athlete (took part in the 2014 World Championship Ironman in Hawaii), teach group fitness classes at Caine Halter YMCA and GHS Life Center®

“We would love to retain our resident physicians so that they can continue to provide exceptional care for upstate patients.”

Leadership Profile

Camiron L. Pfennig, MD, MHPE, Emergency Medicine Program Director

Camiron Pfennig, MD, MHPE, joined Greenville Health System (GHS) in 2015 to realize her dream of starting an Emergency Medicine (EM) residency at Greenville Memorial Hospital (GMH). GHS sees a wide range of patient conditions and a high number of cases throughout its emergency departments—logging nearly 400,000 visits a year! Yet, one piece had been missing from its many services: a residency training program.

GHS’ commitment to training the brightest medical professionals and to advancing health care in the region is what ultimately attracted this brand-new mom to move from Nashville and her faculty position at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. Equally impressive was GHS’ ongoing dedication to recruit faculty from all over the country who can not only teach the science of medicine, but also infuse the art of medicine into resident training.

“We currently have our first 10 interns,” noted Dr. Pfennig. “We will continue to recruit 10 residents annually into this three-year training program.”

Dr. Pfennig, who also serves as an associate professor for the University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville and as faculty director of Colleges for the medical school, devoted much of her first two years focusing on the program’s accreditation process. Thanks in large part to her efforts, the charter class of EM residents began July 2017.

The Indiana native is excited about what this new program can mean not only for GHS but also for the EM residents and the upstate community.

“We are training our residents to be the most competent and caring frontline physicians dealing with patients in the most extreme and unpredictable situations,” she explained.

“In addition, we are training these residents to be able to practice anywhere when they complete this program—be it a rural area or the most sophisticated academic hospital. In fact, our current residents will gain experience in community emergency medicine starting July 2019.”

Dr. Pfennig pointed out how GHS’ newest residency offering aligns with our mission—heal compassionately, teach innovatively, improve constantly—and our vision—transform health care for the benefit of the people and communities we serve—in six major ways:

  • Provides compassionate, high-quality, patient-centered emergency care
  • Ensures an outstanding patient experience
  • Embraces innovative care models
  • Leads academically in education
  • Fosters community service and promotes research in advancing the art and science of emergency medicine
  • Offers a “safety net” to patients in the Upstate and beyond

Another advantage of offering graduate medical education is that doctors often stay where they train. A national 2013 study found that 70% of those who complete both medical school and residency training in the same state tend to remain in that state to practice. In 2016, 28% of GMH graduates were hired by the system. That means the nationwide provider shortage may not be as critical here as elsewhere.

With the high demand for emergency care in the region, GHS already is exploring options to expand the number of residents in this GMH-based program over the next five years. Future plans also call for adding EM residents at other campuses in our system, such as Greer and Oconee.

LEADING THE WAY

Partnership Breaks Barriers, Creates Access

Greenville Health System (GHS), Furman University and South Carolina Legal Services (SCLS) have formed the state’s first Medical-Legal Partnership (MLP). This collaboration focuses on reducing health-harming problems that have legal remedies while educating clinicians, attorneys and students about these issues.

Nancy Powers, MD, a pediatrician with Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics at GHS, and a Furman alumna, is one of the leaders behind this effort. “She was instrumental in developing the proposal to create the MLP, the first of nearly 300 in the country that partners with an undergraduate institution,” noted Eli Hestermann, PhD, executive director for Pre-Professional Studies at GHS as well as The Institute for the Advancement of Community Health at Furman.  Dr. Powers recently was recognized with the Richard Furman Baptist Heritage Award for her commitment to removing social and legal barriers to care for vulnerable populations.

“With support from the system’s Bradshaw Institute for Community Child Health & Advocacy, the MLP plans to expand to include other patient populations and make use of pro bono services of the Greenville Bar Association,” said Dr. Hestermann. SCLS attorney Kirby Mitchell, who directs the MLP, also teaches a special three-week class at Furman that prepares students to serve as MLP interns in both clinical and courtroom settings.

In addition to the MLP, Furman collaborates with GHS and community agencies working to develop a greater understanding of social and economic factors that contribute to healthcare disparities in our communities.

“Building on the award-winning imap collaboration among GHS, Furman, United Way of Greenville County and 211, Furman’s Institute for the Advancement of Community Health is working with the Bradshaw Institute; GHS’ Scott Porter, MD, VP of Equity and Inclusion for the system’s Health Sciences Center; and others to address social determinants of health at the neighborhood level,” Dr. Hestermann explained. (Learn more about imap here.)

This group will work with community representatives to gather local data about health disparities, problems with access to care and other barriers to healthy communities. Such data can inform the efforts of Healthy Greenville 2036 (another new system-led initiative) that aims to make Greenville County the healthiest county in the nation by 2036.

About Healthy Greenville
GHS will provide $4 million a year to the Greenville Health Authority Board of Trustees for grants supporting health-related care, research and education benefiting Greenville County residents. Nine grants recently were awarded in the inaugural Healthy Greenville 2036 announcement. Look for more information in the next edition and learn about the recipients here or in the next issue!

Enriching Experience

As GHS’ primary partner in undergraduate education, Furman University offers the following experiences in which undergraduates can explore healthcare careers in clinical and non-clinical settings:

  • Medical Experience Academy
  • Medical Ethics and Sociology (Medicine Program)
  • Clinical Observation Program
  • Internships in exploring vocational ministry; hospital administration, occupational, physical or speech therapy clinical experiences; and clinical psychology

Learn more.

2017 Graduates of the Medical Experience Academy's Tier 3 program

QUALITY

HIMSS Analytics Stage 7 Survey

GHS is on a journey to optimize patient care through technology. In September, that journey will reach another milestone with an on-site, systemwide HIMSS Analytics Stage 7 survey, conducted by the healthcare research and advisory firm HIMSS.

HIMSS Analytics tracks the adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) technologies in inpatient and outpatient settings. Organizations like GHS work to complete multiple stages with the ultimate goal of reaching Stage 7, a near paperless environment that harnesses technology to support optimized patient care.

“Achieving HIMSS Stage 7 is important to both our patients and the organization,” said Ric Ransom, COO for Greenville Memorial Hospital and executive sponsor of GHS’ HIMSS 7 initiative. “Hospitals that have attained HIMSS Stage 7 have been successful at not only improving patient outcomes, but also reducing medical errors and realizing significant savings in costs, time and resources.”

GHS will undergo the site survey September 21 and 22. It will focus on five key areas:

1) Computer physician order entry (CPOE) and decision support
2) Physician documentation
3) Barcoded medication administration
4) Patient portal capabilities
5) Population health capabilities

Departments involved in the survey will be contacted by a member of the HIMSS 7 project team. To learn more about HIMSS 7, visit Plexus.

HIMSS Analytics is a global healthcare advisor, providing guidance and market intelligence solutions that move the industry forward with insight to enable better health through the use of IT.

STELLAR SERVICE

Stellar Service

July

Bill Owens, chaplain, MSICU/GMH, compassionately supported a family, spending many hours with them in the ICU as they prepared for their loved one’s death. While on his way home one day, Owens learned the patient had died and that the family specifically asked for him to pray with them. He immediately returned to the hospital.

Bobbie Offhaus, unit secretary 5D/GMH, helped a patient’s wife set up her computer so that her husband could watch a live video stream of his father’s funeral. Offhaus also helped troubleshoot problems that came up with the feed. Through her kindness, the patient could view his father’s funeral and see the outpouring of love from those attending the service.

Karla Caruso, RPh, Upstate Medical Pharmacy/GMH, responded compassionately to a caregiver who was frustrated that her patient’s weekly medication rarely was ready on time. The patient could not be left alone or wait in line for long. Since that time, Caruso has made sure his medicine is ready at the same time every week, greatly relieving the caregiver’s stress.

August

Adrianna Overholt, RN, The Family Birthplace–Greer, kept her cool and never left her patient when the air conditioning went out. Overholt kept fans blowing and did everything possible to make her patient comfortable. The patient was impressed with Overholt’s caring, pleasant and professional manner through difficult circumstances.

Brittany Seawright, RN, The Family Birthplace–Greer, assisted co-worker Adrianna Overholt, in supporting a patient in labor on a hot day with no air conditioning. Seawright remained positive and kept the patient focused. “She pushed and sweated right with me,” noted the patient who asked that both Seawright and Overholt be recognized for their compassion and dedication.

Marlie Rahn, wellness coordinator/OMH Wellness Center, showed diligence and kindness when a citizen called asking for help in reporting elder abuse. The caller did not know what authority to contact. Rahn did not know, but promised she would find out. After making numerous calls, she contacted the individual and supplied phone numbers and the process for reporting suspected abuse.

September

Robert Burns, paramedic/Mobile Care, shared the gift of music with a patient from Roger C. Peace Hospital. The patient missed having a radio; he especially missed listening to country music. While the patient’s nurse situated his belongings in the van, Burns downloaded the patient’s favorite songs to his personal phone to listen to during transport. With tears in his eyes, the patient thanked Robert for making his day.

Tyler Yoder, RN, Med-Surg/OMH, saw that his co-workers needed help after a busy night. On learning that interruptions had delayed the charge nurse from giving out medications, Yoder jumped in and dispensed all the medications. He has stepped up to this task before during a morning rush. He never asks if assistance is needed, just quietly lends a helping hand.

Wendy Kenney, RN, Radiology Nursing, made an extra effort to help staff when a patient had soiled his bed during transport to CT. Although it was late in the day and this was not her patient, she cleaned the patient, changing his entire bed and his gown, and stayed to complete all of the documentation. During the entire time, she was courteous, professional and compassionate.

Volunteers of the Month

Lou Leffler is the Volunteer of the Month for July. Genuine and respectful to all, Leffler has volunteered 6,800 hours in the Emergency and Ambulatory Service departments at Oconee Memorial Hospital over the last 11 years. A past president of Oconee Medical Campus Auxiliary, he currently is secretary of the S.C. Association of Hospital Auxiliaries–Piedmont District and a member of the Auxiliary to Greenville Health System Executive Committee.

Ben Reynolds is the Volunteer of the Month for August. Since 2009, Reynolds has volunteered over 2,250 hours at Greenville Memorial Hospital. He serves twice a week in the Surgery Waiting Room where his high energy and trademark smile can foster communication between families and staff. The current president of Greenville Memorial Medical Campus Auxiliary, he also chairs the Auxiliary to Greenville Health System Executive Committee. 

Standard of the Month

Heal Compassionately:
Clean Your Hands

The evidence is clear. Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) frequently are spread between patients and healthcare workers through their hands. As GHS keeps hand hygiene at the forefront of patient care, it is important to remember that we all are responsible for cleaning our hands to prevent the spread of infection. That is why observe good hand hygiene is one of our COMPASSION Standards. Washing our hands protects patients, coworkers, visitors, family and friends.

In patient care areas, GHS follows the World Health Organization’s Five Moments of Hand Hygiene:

1. Before patient contact
2. Before aseptic procedure
3. After body fluid exposure risk
4. After touching a patient
5. After touching patient surroundings

Kudos

Emily Buchanan, BSN, RN, Cancer Institute, received a DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses. Buchanan was nominated by a patient for her professionalism and compassion. She calmly and thoroughly explained the patient’s chemotherapy, side effects and tips for lessening those effects as much as possible. Whenever the patient had problems drinking liquids, Buchanan arranged her schedule to give the patient IV hydration. “She identified with the humanity in all of us,” the patient wrote. “When I was grumpy or depressed, Emily was there with a smile and never tried to minimize what I was experiencing.”

Manuel Casanova, MD, endowed chair for Childhood Neurotherapeutics, along with researchers from Duke University and the University of Miami School of Medicine, won the first-ever Frontiers Spotlight Award for a study of brain augmentation and its impact on human super-intelligence. The award comes with a $100,000 prize that will facilitate an international scientific conference on brain augmentation in 2018.

Shea Garbett, manager, Marketing Services, was inducted into the 2017 class of Top Hospital Marketers of the Year DTC Perspectives, Inc., the leading conference, training and publishing company for consumer marketing of hospitals, pharmaceuticals, and healthcare products. Honorees were judged based on industry reputation, accomplishments, innovation, and notoriety among their peers, partners, and media.

Robert Saul, MD, medical director, General Pediatrics/Children’s Hospital, has published All About Children, a book where parents and children can explore and learn about the world around them through everyday activities. All About Children is a companion to Dr. Saul’s earlier book, My Children’s Children: Raising Young Citizens in the Age of Columbine. Both books are available on Amazon.com.

Bobbie Rhodes, organization development consultant, Academy of Leadership & Development, was featured in Healthcare Business Insight’s March 2017 Cost & Quality Academy Journal article, “Alleviating Workplace Bullying to Provide a Positive Care Environment and Improve Patient Safety.” Rhodes has long been involved in education around lateral violence and disruptive behavior; this article cites GHS’ leadership development and training efforts since 2008 aimed at reducing bullying in the workplace. 

Advanced Family Medicine in Clinton has been named an accredited Rural Health Clinic by the American Association for Accreditation of Ambulatory Surgery Facilities. The goal of the Rural Health Clinic program is to increase access to primary care services for Medicare and Medicaid patients in rural areas.

GHS is among 11 hospitals and health systems to receive the ECRI Institute 2017 Healthcare Supply Chain Achievement Award. This honor recognizes healthcare organizations for excellence in balancing cost, quality and outcomes. This year’s winners were selected from nearly 3,000 members nationwide.

Cary Stroud, MD, medical director, Supportive Care Team/Children’s Hospital, was honored with the naming of the Dr. Cary E. Stroud Camper Care Center at Pleasant Ridge Camp & Retreat Center. Clement’s Kindness Fund for the Children; Greenville County Parks, Recreation & Tourism; and Children’s Hospital dedicated the center in Dr. Stroud’s honor for his lifelong dedication to serving children with cancer and serious blood disorders. He was instrumental in establishing Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at GHS in 1986. The center, now known as the BI-LO® Charities Children’s Cancer Center, has tripled in size and offers a complete range of treatments for patients with pediatric cancer or serious blood disorders.

Pleasant Ridge Camp & Retreat Center, home of Camp Courage and Camp Spearhead, is owned and operated by Greenville County Parks, Recreation & Tourism and provides individuals with medical, physical or intellectual limitations a place to experience camp. The new facility will increase the center’s ability to serve medically fragile campers.

Readers’ Choice
Congratulations to these GHS providers, facilities and services voted “best of” by newspaper readers in their respective communities:

Greer Citizen
Christina Cameron, MD, of Cypress Internal Medicine–Greer was voted best family doctor; Greer Memorial Hospital was voted best emergency department; and the Greer office of The Children’s Clinic was voted best pediatrician.

Best of the Upstate Awards
GHS was voted Best Place to Work and MD360® Convenient Care was voted Best Urgent Care by readers of The Greenville News.

 

Clinton Chronicle
Laurens County Memorial Hospital was named Best Hospital.

GHS Hospice of the Foothills in Seneca has been awarded the SHP (Strategic Healthcare Programs) Best Premier Performer award for achieving an overall CAHPS hospice caregiver satisfaction score that ranked in the top 5% of all SHP clients during 2016.

AROUND THE SYSTEM

2017 United Way Campaign

The 2017 GHS United Way Campaign officially kicked off during the July 26 Leadership Development Retreat. Our goal this year is to raise more than $1 million. We are more than half-way there! Watch for details in “What’s Happening at GHS” and on Plexus to learn how you can support the many lives touched through Greenville United Way.

New Muscular Dystrophy Clinic

Neuroscience Associates received a grant from the Muscular Dystrophy Association to start a clinic that will provide multi-disciplinary care for patients with a number of neuromuscular diseases. The clinic will be held monthly at the practice’s Greer Medical Campus location and led by Drs. Sandip Jain and Sergiu Besliu.

Healthy Living Partnership

Laurens County Medical Campus is partnering with the Clinton Community Garden to expand access to fresh fruits and vegetables in the Clinton community. Read more about the partnership in the Clinton Chronicle.

Research Study Participants Needed

GHS and its partners are looking for individuals to participate in a study of the muscle health of breast cancer survivors versus healthy individuals. Email ruck@greenvillemed.sc.edu or call 455-1410 to learn more. Individuals with spinal cord injuries also are  needed for a study on the effects of hand-cycling on fitness, heart health and quality of life. Call 455-7995 or email smartin2@greenvillemed.sc.edu to learn more.

Stay up-to-date with GHS Cancer Institute clinical trials and innovative therapies by subscribing to the GHS Cancer Institute Newsletter here.

GHS Emergency Medicine Residency Begins

Welcome to the 10 members of the charter class of the GHS Emergency Residency Program!

New Issue of GHS Proceedings

The third issue of GHS Proceedings is now available online. This peer-reviewed journal shares advances in academic and translational research activities happening at GHS and throughout the world. The journal welcomes Original Articles, Review Articles, Case Reports or Case Series, Special Articles, as well as Editorials, Letters to the Editor, Value Vignettes, Opinions and other types of publications from all areas and fields.

Physicians Complete Leadership Training

Seventeen GHS physicians recently completed a six-month program to receive a certificate in leadership development. The program is a collaboration between Furman University and the GHS Academy of Leadership and Professional Development. It includes courses designed to deepen knowledge of areas like healthcare policy, population health and finance, as well as interpersonal skills development and practice. Graduates include Drs. Gary Abrams, Vito Cancellaro, Bill Childers, William Cobb, Kacey Eichelberger, Jeff Elder, Bruce Hanlin, Amanda Hartke, Michael Jenkins, Steve Lowe, Mitch McClure, Naveen Parti, Sarah Payne-Poff, Cami Pfennig, David Schammel, Patrick Springhart and Michael Stewart.

Nursing Excellence

Patient Experience, the Sum of All Interactions

Magnet® Recognition programs emphasize communication as essential to high performing organizations. When we make that personal connection, we establish trust, which in turn, builds compliance—and that impacts outcomes.

As clinicians (and all employees are clinicians), each of us at GHS can influence the patient and family experience in some way. For instance . . .

—The EVS housekeeper creates an environment clean and free of clutter. A clean environment helps patients feel safer. An uncluttered surrounding is healing.

—A front-desk receptionist answers the phone in a pleasant and welcoming tone. The person on the line may be anxious or concerned about a troubling diagnosis. The compassionate and attentive way in which the staff member answers the phone can help lessen the caller’s suffering.

—The nurse providing clinical care at the bedside listens to patients’ anxieties and fears—even those not directly related to their condition—who will take care of my pet? How will my injury affect my ability to work? Acknowledging those concerns creates a more positive experience.

Communication, both verbal and non-verbal, is the foundation of life. We see that in our personal relationships as well as in interactions with patients and families. Our body language, even when we are on break, can influence how patients or families feel about their GHS experience whether in the ED waiting room, the cafeteria, pharmacy or other public area.

How do you speak to others during the course of your day? Do you use words patients can understand? Are you present when talking with patients, families or co-workers? In that moment, do they have your full attention?

When we look at the patient experience in tandem with our organizational goals for patient satisfaction, how we communicate establishes the foundation for trust, compliance and positive outcomes.

 

 

Antoinette “Toni” Land, MBA, BSN, RN, CPXP, is director of Patient Experience at GHS.

July Service Anniversaries

40 Years
Caprice Alexander
Inge Crocker
Lillian Murphy

35 Years
Jerry Chism
Susan Morgan
Bill Wylie

30 Years
Robert Broker
Stuart Lane
Landrum McCarrell
Cyndi Shands
Angelo Sinopoli
Felecia Webb

25 Years
Lynn Aneskievich
Jeff Hanna
Bruce Latham
Patrick McLear
John Phillips
Lynda Sykes
Spence Taylor

20 Years
Michael Avant
Leala Avery
Keith Caldwell
Frances Carroll
Deborah Cauthen

Trey Chandler
Donna Dorn
Heather Galbreath
Gladys McGuire
Lisa McNally
Terence McNally
Gulzar Merchant
Paul Miller
Kelly Mullinax
Chandra Pressley
Deborah Rice
Kathy Stevenson
Derek Watson
Sara Whitfield

15 Years
Dedra Aderhold
Sara Barker
Frankie Black
Andrew Deloach
Clare Fulcher
Tony Garrett
Heather Garrison
Heather Hughes
Ashley Jordan
Michelle Julian
Sheryl Knupp
Lauren Langley
Cynthia Lanphear
Angie Miller
Lindsey Moore
Betty Morgan

Alan Smith
Donna Steading
Lori Suit
Stephanie Tanner
Keri Thompson
John Thorpe
Vanessa Tucker
Cheryl Washington
Juana Wideman
Patrick Williams
Ruth Woodrum
Jonathan Wright

10 Years
Mark Androes
Christy Arnold
Olga Arnold
Ashley Burriss
Alfredo Carbonell
Gail Carson
Cathy Chapman
Rebekah Crooks
Morgan Crytser
Andrea Cunningham
Linda Dann
Holly Daves
Josh Doll
Suzanne Fanning
Michelle Fleming
Michele Fowble
Ana Funariu

Ashley Geary
Michele Gebo
Mattie Gordon
Sarah Guinn
Matthew Hindman
Amanda Hinton
Nikki Holmes
George Hunter
Tracy Jeter
Alicia Johnson
Bonne Johnson
Wanda Keeter
Teresa Kennedy
Heather Krinock
John Kuhl
Cynthia Langston
Angie Leslie
David Lowery
Tracy McCalla
Leann McKee
Monica McKeever
Cindy Metcalf
Helen Moore
Dale Porter
Annette Prewett
Timothy Sanders
Ruthie Shealy
Sherri Shepard
Kate Smith
Mary Smyth
Wendei Stoltie
Quise Stroud
Azim Surka

Brenda Thames
Mike Townsend
Dev Vaz
Crystal Wham
Nikeya Wideman
Amy Wilborne

5 Years
Tammi Ashmore
Whitney Atkins
Kim Barr
Kathy Barrett
Britt Bolemon
Cara Bostrom
Charlene Brooks
Megan Brotherton
Erik Busby
Cassandra Bussey
Dwyniece Calhoun
Nancy Carr
Kisha Cobb
Katara Covin
Carreen Drake
Tricia Eichhorn
Cindy Erexson
Sara Evans
Delena Flood
Sandy Freshwaters
Tracy Gillen
Ashleigh Gohean
Noble Graddy
Brook Grzelecki
Ashley Hitchcock

Laura Hopper
Liz Howell
Julie Hrobsky
Linda Huckaby
Shanon Humphries
Dinah Jankovic
Amanda Kamman
Rachel Kappel
Debra Knowlton
Nancy Kraft
Barbara Krassowski
Einar Lurix
Joe Maurer
Trisha McGrath
Ashley Metcalf
Christa Moormeier
Aaron Murray
Hannah Nester
Kim Pugh
Lisa Ramos
Steven Samoya
Angie Satterfield
Colt Shope
Lindsay Sim
Ashley Simpson
Dale Smith
Jeanette Smith
Tara Sowizral
Stacy Stokes
Melinda Tellez
Sarah Thompson
Zoe Tighe
Marina Van Dalen

August Service Anniversaries

45 Years
Linda Barber
Sandy Mayfield

40 Years
Jan Flowe
Tootsi Hopkins
Valerie Shaw

35 Years
Bill Byars
Charmaine Dixon
Roger Gower
Cindy Greer
Debra Hadley
Henry Hill
Delories Holland
Sharon McKinney
Libby Stinnett

30 Years
Alana Biggerstaff
Birgit Kelley

25 Years
Pam Bartley
Beth Clark
Kathy Conner
Kevin Kopera
Debbie Mason
Jacqueline Roach
Paul Schlapp

20 Years
Lynne Baker
Sharon Barry
Kevin Boyer
Pamela Burton
Robyn Ellison
Albert Fedalei
Misti Greer
Daniel Grover
Theresa Harvey
Sly Lee
John Murray
Shelia Ogles
Sheri Starr
Melanie Thurston
Barbara West
Barbara Wiles

15 Years
Debbie Anders
Jessica Anderson
Beckey Campbell
Ronnie Childs
Jennifer Clark
Priscilla Crawford
Nancy Easley
Dana Fuller
Sally Griffin
Philip Hodge
Desmond Kelly
Ruth Kelly

Jane Ludwig
Robert Morgan
Courtney Pack
Tracy Reynolds
Ladie Romero
Yorleny Salazar
Amanda Scopteuolo
Ken Shields
Shannon Simmerman
Sue Templeton
Donna Warlick
Joanne Webbenhurst
Amy Welcome
Jason Wise

10 Years
Stephanie Armstrong
Fran Batson
Myrtleen Campbell
Vito Cancellaro
Jana Carroll
Heather Cataldo
Kim Clark
Wendy Cornett
Elizabeth Cox
Amy Crockett
Kimberly Crow
Teresa Dunkle

Margaret Durham
Kim Feltman
Cassie Gibbes
Kim Griffin
Susan Harris
Leslie Harvie
Joan Marie Hernandez
Carlos Hershberger
Angela Hutcheson
Liliana Jenkins
Trinia Jones
Hunter Kome
Angie Mauney
Shannon McCandless
Wanda Moore
Sharon Occhipinti
Mark Pierce
Toria Rayford
Theodore Rothman
Kevin Springle
Jenni Tice
Wanda Tollison
Okey Uzor
Michelle White
Sherry Young

5 Years
Kristina Allen
Monique Arce

Christina Augustine
Katie Ballard
Melissa Bruno
Andrea Bryan
Katie Buechler
Allison Burnett
Caroline Campbell
Steven Carter
Neha Chowdhary
Ruthanne Christopher
Susan Cobb
Joni Coker
Becky Eubanks
Bill Evans
Chevette Fields
Jennifer Galloway
Kim Glenister
Terry Hamilton
Sam Heine
David Hoenicke
Jessica Jenkins
Amy Johnson
Lindsay Johnson
Marta Kaiser
Jennifer Knoke
Mandie Kugler
Tricia Leighton
Anne Long
Chuck Marguet
Melissa Mascaro

Eric Munson
Whitney Murray
Tabitha Neal
Ashley Offhaus
Debbie Porter
Krista Pray
Jessica Propst
Devan Radtke
Miaka Reynolds
Silvia Rho
Richard Sabo
Meredith Seitzer
Lateria Sibert
Candace Snyder
Kerri Susko
Melanie Timblin
Maryori Watt
Nancy Weaver
Rebekah Webb
Shelly Wesley
Mark Wess
Karen Weston-Williams
Dana Williams
Jessica Williams
Megan Williams
Cindy Youssef
Angie Zuendt

September Service Anniversaries

45 Years
Heyward Smith

40 Years
Eddie Bonaparte

35 Years
Tami Estelle
Lynn Henderson

30 Years
Mike Coe
Lynn Holland
Delia Velasquez

25 Years
Joey Anthony
Shelley Bridges
Rachel Jones
Jane Smith

20 Years
Susan Allsep
Angie Bergstrom
Melanie Braisted
Kevin Burch
Alicia Clardy
Cooley Cooley
Louis Dolinar
Edy Gosnell
Cheryl Haynie
Katrina Hubbard

Greg Johnson
Michelle Jones
Michelle Martin
Tracie McConnell
Suzanne Messich
Linda Pettay
Nancy Powers
Liz Rhoney
Marianne Shannon
Kathy Spitz
Tangie Wolfe

15 Years
Sandra Allen
Betty Bassam
Kristi Black
Darla Bryant
Susan Durecki
Mike Faulkner
Iris Fowler
Kellie Goodwin
Tony Griffin
Shannon Hall
Joy Harris
Laura Jaworski
Brigitte King
Bridgette Little
Miriam Mahlstedt
Gwen Meredith-Thompson
Stephanie Moore

Alan Mullinax
Ginger O’Kelley
Patty Phillips
Lisa Renrick
Linda Reynolds
Missy Richard
Timmy Shirley
Christine Soghigian
Amy Solesbee
Tina Sprouse
Ken Trofatter
Amie Turner
Didi Whitten
Lynn Wilkie

10 Years
Debra Aldrich
Jodie Balue
Kenneth Becker
Mary Belanger
Tiffany Bottoms
Sandra Boyce
Tenisha Boyd
Lori Brown
Season Buchanan
Kelly Cartee
Stacy Dargis
Kimberlin Delvalle
Kevin Derfler
Amy Dodds
Tiffany Fowler
Penny Galbraith

Angela Gilliard
Kelly Glynn
Matt Griffin
Linda Handley
Janine Jones
Tammy McNeel
Denine Miller
Lisa Miller
Mary Carolyn Moore
Leann Phillips
Susan Polomski
Christina Probst
Keith Reynolds
Rebecca Roberts
Chrisena Rush
Sara Shamblin
Steve Stewart
Holly Stoxen
Debbie Stuckey
Jim Suhrer
Nicole Sullivan
Kelly Sweeney
Cindy Swetenburg
Lynn Teague
Jen Terlizzi
Danielle Terry
Vaughan Thandroyen
Leigh Tully
Shawn Vincent
Robin Wellmon

Joy Wininger
Rena Woodruff
Glenda Yeargin

5 Years
Kim Alexander
Stephanie Anderson
Michele Balderson
Dawn Blackwell
Josh Brownlee
Joel Burke
Charlotte Chappell
Jill Cole
Nina Collins
Rachel Cormier
Paul Davis
Jason Day
Timothy Dekle
Ann Marie Edwards
Holly Ellingworth
Hilda Eppolito
Ileana Escobedo
Suzanne Garrison
Leslie Gray
Nadine Gwinn
Emily Hall
Jennifer Healy
Chad Hembree
Lateish Hill
Mitch Howell
Jessica Hudson

Elizabeth Jacobs
Cindy James
Jessica Johnson
Robb  Johnson
Victoria  Johnson
Nichole Kelley
Brooke King
Sydney Knight
Viktoriya Kolesnyk
Linda League
Anna-Kate Leverette
Sandra Matthews
Matt Mumaugh
Stephanie New
Sarah Parker
Candice Parsons
Shirelle Rhodes
Sonya Richardson
Ikeisha Roberts
Brandon Rockwell
Ingrid Roman
Elizabeth Taylor
Beth Thompson
Kimberly Tumbleston
William Turner
Julia Urban
Brittany Wassen
Kim Welborn
Cindy Wright

Upcoming Events

Let’s Get Curious!
Through Sept. 24—Upcountry History Museum. The insatiable curiosity of Curious George comes to life through a special exhibition sponsored by GHS. Learn more at www.upcountryhistory.org.

Handbags for Hope
Sept. 28—Enjoy a night of shopping and socializing to benefit the S.C. Ovarian Cancer Foundation. For tickets, visit scovariancancer.org.

Is Weight-loss Surgery for You?
Learn from GHS bariatric surgeons what may be the best weight-loss option for you on Tuesdays, 1 p.m., and Wednesdays, 9 a.m., at 2104 Woodruff Road. Free; registration required. Call 676-1072. 

Healthy Way
This free nutrition class focuses on creating positive nutrition changes for cancer survivors and takes place Thursdays, 3:30-4:30 p.m., at the GHS Cancer Institute. To register, call 455-2862.

Oconee Memorial Hospital Golf Classic
Sept. 28—The 10th annual Oconee Memorial Hospital (OMH) Foundation Golf Classic to benefit OMH programs will take place at The Cliffs at Keowee Falls. Questions? Email cnations@ghs.org.

Race for the Cure
Sept. 30
—Join the GHS team in raising funds for local breast cancer programs by participating in this 5K run/walk at Fluor Field. Register here.

 Light the Night
Oct. 19—Join the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society in raising funds to cure blood cancer by participating in this evening walk at the BMW Performance Center. To learn more, visit lightthenight.org/south-carolina.

Greenville Polo Classic
Oct. 22—
This event takes place at Hopkins Farm and raises funds for the South Carolina chapter of the ALS Association. For tickets, visit greenvillepoloclassic.org.

Tips For a Healthier You at Health Center
At Greenville Health System, we want to encourage residents of the Upstate to make healthy life choices—and that includes our own employees.

In August, we relaunched our online HealthCenter, which serves as a hub to connect users to useful articles, podcasts, videos, events and infographics about how to live healthy lives. Content will change regularly, so check back often!

Run4Life 5K
Nov. 4
—This 5K run and one-mile walk takes place at the Caine Halter YMCA and raises funds for the Cancer Society of Greenville County and GHS’ Institute for Translational Oncology Research. Visit run4lifesc.org.

Donate for the Troops!
The 6th annual “Every Piece Matters” Item Drive for the Troops runs Oct. 2-Nov. 10. This collection supports the local chapter of Blue Star Mothers that ships care packages to Upstate soldiers serving overseas. Watch for  details in What’s Happening at GHS and on Plexus.

See a full list of GHS classes and events at www.ghs.org/events.

Community Connections

Children’s Hospital Celebrates Radiothon’s 10th Anniversary

Children’s Hospital Radiothon raised $305,500 and celebrated its 10th Anniversary on August 3 and 4. In partnership with Entercom Upstate, Radiothon took place in the lobby of Greenville Memorial Hospital with live broadcasts from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on each of the seven Entercom stations: 106.3 WORD, ESPN Upstate, Classic Rock 101.1, 93.3 The Planet, Magic 98.9, B93.7 and 96.3 The Block.

Throughout the two-day event, on-air personalities shared stories and interviews from patients and families who have been served by GHS Children’s Hospital’s Bryan NICU, Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital, BI-LO® Children’s Charities Cancer Center and other Children’s Hospital programs and services.

Including this year’s contributions, Radiothon has raised 2.9 million for GHS Children’s Hospital over the last 10 years!

Children’s Hospital Patient Sam Esteban meets Canine F.E.T.C.H. service dogs Kalle and Vivitar at this year’s Radiothon.

Along the Path of Totality

The opportunity to view a total solar eclipse is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for most people. GHS Eye Institute made sure thousands in the Upstate had a safe means for watching this major celestial event by giving away 34,000 ISO certified eclipse-viewing glasses!

Labor and Delivery nurses at Greenville Memorial Hospital show off the special onesies that were given to babies on August 21 to commemorate the solar eclipse.

To report news, email ghsnews@ghs.org

Meredith McGinnis, Editor

Connect with us. Learn what’s going on at GHS.
Access The View on the Employee Access page at ghs.org
and the News and Communication page on Plexus