Our Affiliate System

We are building one organization with affiliates in two regions. Our parent company, now known as Prisma Health, supports both affiliates with overall direction and leadership as we continue to align. We will soon share one brand across the entire organization to better reflect this. The rebranded Palmetto Health-USC Medical Group will continue to operate as a joint venture between the Midlands affiliate and the USC School of Medicine.

Learn more
We are becoming Prisma Health in early 2019

The View – October – 2017

Volume 69, Issue 5

October 2017

Healthy Greenville 2036 Announces Initial Grants

Representatives are included from each of the nine Healthy Greenville 2036 grants.

Last year, GHS launched Healthy Greenville 2036, a one-of-a-kind initiative that supports our commitment to making a difference in the health and wellness of our communities. Healthy Greenville is an $80 million, 20-year pledge to help make Greenville County the healthiest county in America by 2036.

The initiative is led by the Greenville Health Authority (GHA) Board of Trustees, which announced the first grant recipients of this landmark initiative in September. These initial nine grants amount to $12.4 million and target chronic issues such as diabetes, mental illness, obesity as well as social determinants and other factors that impact access to care.

In addition, programs funded by these grants are expected to create 21 new jobs and strengthen workforce development through enhanced job training for nearly 1,200 positions.

“We knew our Healthy Greenville 2036 initiative would significantly improve Greenville County’s health over the next 20 years,” said Lisa Stevens, chair of the GHA Board of Trustees. “But how fantastic is it that we can work toward that long-range goal while also taking concrete steps that could literally save lives within months.”

Here is a look at the programs and initiatives these grants will benefit:

“We knew our Healthy Greenville 2036 initiative would significantly improve Greenville County’s health over the next 20 years. But how fantastic is it that we can work toward that long-range goal while also taking concrete steps that could literally save lives within months.” —Lisa Stevens, chair of the GHA Board of Trustees

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• Standardized training and equipment for approximately 900 firefighter/first responders countywide and life-saving automated external defibrillators (AEDs) for 266 deputy patrol cars.

• In-home and in-community diabetes prevention and management services in Greenville County, where almost 10 percent of the population has diabetes.

• Streamline the comprehensive health initiative serving Greenville County’s highest-need children. The initial focus will be on four existing School-based Health Centers (three in West Greenville middle schools and one at Greenville Early College), with expansion to two high schools. In addition to health care, nutrition and health education, and physical fitness, the program’s mission builds resiliency in children exposed to adverse events.

• Scholarships for 10 medical students specially trained in areas such as lifestyle medicine, addiction or substance misuse.

• Program to strengthen efforts to assist non-custodial fathers and potentially help them connect more strongly with their children.

• Increased individualized case management for young families.

• Expanded primary care access by providing 10 scholarships for nurse practitioners from diverse or under-represented groups.

• Increased access to child care by offering more than 400 scholarships.

• Expanded mental health services in Greenville County, including establishing a new facility for rehabilitative support services for adults with mental illness.

Nearly 130 organizations submitted letters of intent for consideration during the 2017 grant cycle. Of those, 16 were invited to submit full grant applications, with nine being approved for grants.

2017 Grant Recipients

Clemson University School of Public Health

Clemson University School of Nursing

Gateway House

Greenville County EMS

Greenville Health System

Greenville County First Steps

Little Steps

University of South Carolina

Upstate Fatherhood Coalition

Read more details on the grantees and their programs here.

The GHA board has released a request for proposals for the next round of grants. The deadline for potential grantees to submit letters of intent is November 14. To learn more about Healthy Greenville 2036, visit ghs.org/healthygreenville.

Greenville County EMS paramedics and Greenville County police officers demonstrate CPR. One grant provides standardized training for first responders and places AEDs in 266 patrol cars.

LEADERSHIP

As we begin this new fiscal year, I gratefully acknowledge your hard work over the past year and thank you for your continued commitment to our patients and their families. Each of you makes a difference in the lives of those we serve every day.

President's Report
FY 2018 Goals: Supporting Commitment to High-quality Patient Care

October marks the start of a new fiscal year for GHS and new opportunities to refocus our commitment to making a difference in the lives of our patients, their families and our communities.

One of these new opportunities is Healthy Greenville 2036, our one-of-a-kind initiative to create innovative avenues for transformed and improved health and well-being for our communities now and for future generations. Through this initiative, we advance our century-old commitment to providing high-quality, compassionate care to patients and families that each of you demonstrates every moment of every day.

Our fiscal year goals help us measure how well we support the clinician-patient relationship and our stewardship of resources that allows us to provide the best care to every patient who walks through our doors. The success of these goals affects us all, regardless of our role at GHS. That’s why it’s important to me that all employees know our system-level priorities for FY18.

FY18 Organizational Goals and Measures

People: We work to transform health care.
• Employee Opinion Survey Participation Rate: 89%
• Wellness Measure: 5% increase in the number of employees completing wellness screenings

Experience: We make patients and families the focus of everything we do.
• Inpatient: 75th percentile HCAHPS
• Ambulatory/Physician Practices: 75th percentile CGCAHPS
• Emergency Services: 75th percentile National Press Ganey database

Quality: We provide right care at the right time and in the right place.
• Zero Harm Measures: Reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections by 20%; reduce Clostridium difficile infections by 20%; and reduce central line-associated bloodstream infections by 20%
• Magnet Journey: Achieve Magnet® recognition at Greenville Memorial Hospital

Engagement: We partner with many communities to improve health.
MyChart Utilization Rate: Achieve 30% account activation rate

Finance: We responsibly direct our resources to support our mission.
• Operating Margin: 1.5%
• Total PMPM Spend: Increase per member per month spend by no more than 5% over FY17 PMPM cost

Academics: We educate to transform health care.
• Scholarly Activity: 250 peer reviewed publications with GHS identification/ attribution

We all have a shared interest in achieving these goals. Results from the People, Experience, Quality, Engagement and Finance pillars influence the annual employee incentive. FY18 “spotlight” goals—Magnet Status, Total PMPM Spend and the Wellness Measure—however, do not factor into the employee incentive but are key system strategies that we will track and measure over the next 12 months.

As we begin this new fiscal year, I gratefully acknowledge your hard work over the past year and thank you for your continued commitment to our patients and their families. Each of you makes a difference in the lives of those we serve every day.

I look forward to seeing each of you at an upcoming Town Hall meeting.

Spence M. Taylor, MD
President

Quick Takes

Hometown: Pekin, Illinois

Family: Spouse W. Franklin Sease Jr., MD (employed at GHS Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas) and two children, Ryan, 15, and Abby, 11.

Work/life balance: I love to entertain, enjoy a beautiful garden, shop and explore the world with my family and friends.

“I believe deeply in the vision of the Bradshaw Institute to create optimal health for all children we serve. I feel lucky to have such passion for the work I do. Having the amazing support of the Children’s Hospital and GHS, not to mention the fantastic team at the Bradshaw Institute and our community partners, is just the cherry on top.”

Leadership Profile

Kerry Sease, MD, MPH, medical director, Bradshaw Institute for Community Child Health & Advocacy; senior medical director, Academic Pediatrics

Before Kerry Sease, MD, MPH, became medical director of GHS Children’s Hospital’s Bradshaw Institute for Community Child Health & Advocacy, she spent 10 years as the director of the Pediatric Residency Program. In this role, Dr. Sease spent much time with these residents at GHS’ Center for Pediatric Medicine, where many of Greenville’s underserved children go for their medical care.

Seeing so many of these children and getting a sense of the challenging circumstances that defined their home environments set the stage for her role with the Bradshaw Institute. The institute’s mission is to promote child health and family wellness, and advance child health through education and research.

“Creating health for the children in our communities requires us to rewrite the narrative on health beyond the walls of the traditional healthcare provider and into the community,” said Dr. Sease.

Part of her role with the Bradshaw Institute involves providing medical direction for the four school-based health centers the institute operates at schools in Greenville’s underserved communities.

“These health centers increase access to care for communities where it may be challenging for parents to otherwise obtain medical care for their child,” the Illinois native pointed out. “It’s helping us keep parents and children where they belong—at work and at school.”

The centers also give somewhat of a glimpse into social factors that may be affecting students’ health and provide an opportunity to connect the child and family to community resources.

“We know those factors exist, and we know the effect they have on a child’s long-term health,” she stated.

Now, thanks to one of the inaugural Healthy Greenville 2036 grants, these centers will be an avenue through which to provide students with additional support. With the help of a $3.38 million grant, a coalition led by GHS will provide some of Greenville’s highest-need students with health education as well as nutritional and physical activity opportunities and psychological support. Part of the goal is to build resiliency in children exposed to adverse childhood experiences.

“I believe deeply in the vision of the Bradshaw Institute to create optimal health for all children we serve,” said Dr. Sease, who also is the senior medical director of Pediatric Academics. “I feel lucky to have such passion for the work I do. Having the amazing support of the Children’s Hospital and GHS, not to mention the fantastic team at the Bradshaw Institute and our community partners, is just the cherry on top.”

LEADING THE WAY

Harnessing EMR Technology to Optimize Patient Care

Greenville Health System has been validated as a HIMSS Analytics Stage 7 organization. HIMSS Analytics tracks the adoption of electronic medical record (EMR) technologies in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. Organizations like GHS work to complete multiple stages with the ultimate goal of achieving Stage 7, a near paperless environment that harnesses technology to support optimized patient care.

Only 5.3 percent of U.S. hospitals have achieved Stage 7, and GHS has the first acute care facilities in South Carolina to attain the status.

“Achieving HIMSS Stage 7 is important to both our patients and our organization,” said Rich Rogers, vice president of Information Services and chief information officer at GHS. “Those that have attained HIMSS Stage 7 have been successful at not only improving patient outcomes but reducing medical errors as well. They have also experienced significant savings in terms of costs, time and resources. I am proud of the GHS team and all of the work that went into making this validation possible. We are committed to transforming health care and will continue to seek out new and innovative ways to improve quality of care and patient safety using information technology.”

GHS underwent a HIMSS Stage 7 site survey in September. The survey focused on five key areas: computer physician order entry and decision support, physician documentation, barcoded medication administration, patient portal capabilities and population health capabilities.

“GHS has achieved a level of consistency of use that is rare among integrated delivery systems, which is indicative of a strong sense of urgency and effective leadership to get everyone on board in using the EMR,” said John Hoyt, Stage 7 revalidation lead for HIMSS Analytics. “All of this has been accomplished in a few short years. Additionally, GHS has effectively used EMR tools to begin making significant progress in dealing with health status issues that are particularity endemic to their market such as diabetes and obesity.”

An example of how this technology helps physicians is exemplified when treating patients diagnosed with diabetes. These patients should have an annual eye exam. Physicians can look for the patient’s eye exam results electronically during the visit and if an exam has not been performed, the physician can emphasize the importance of the appointment.

” I am proud of the GHS team and all of the work that went into making this validation possible. We are committed to transforming health care and will continue to seek out new and innovative ways to improve quality of care and patient safety using information technology.” —Rich Rogers, vice president of Information Services and chief information officer at GHS

QUALITY

Four Hospitals Earn Zero Harm Awards

Greenville Memorial Hospital, Greer Memorial Hospital, Hillcrest Memorial Hospital and Laurens County Memorial Hospital recently earned a “Certified Zero Harm Award” from the South Carolina Hospital Association (SCHA) for their excellent work in preventing hospital-acquired infections.

Greenville: Recognized for preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections in its cardiovascular and neuro-trauma ICUs

Greer: Recognized for preventing central line-associated bloodstream infections in its ICU, as well as preventing surgical site infections in abdominal hysterectomies, colon surgeries and knee replacements

Hillcrest and Laurens: Recognized for preventing surgical site infections in colon surgeries, hip replacements and knee replacements

Since 2014, SCHA has given out Zero Harm Awards to hospitals on the forefront of preventing medical errors. To earn this award, hospitals must experience no preventable hospital-acquired infections of a specific nature over an extended time. Data used for the awards are independently verified by the SC Department of Health and Environmental Control, recognizing the exceptional achievement the hospital or its unit has made to provide safe, high-quality care.

(l-r) John Mansure, COO, Eastern Region; Saria Saccocio, MD, Ambulatory Chief Medical Officer; and Justin Benfield, COO, Southern Region

STELLAR SERVICE

Stellar Service

October

This month’s stellar stars are connected by a central story in which each employee’s compassion and understanding made it possible for a patient and family to share a joyful, reverential time for healing on the patients’ terms and according to their faith practices. They were nominated by Chaplain Jennifer Dill, who was overwhelmed by the employees’ kindness and willingness to help.

Darrin Sorenson, PT, CWS, Physical Therapy/GMH was the first person to respond to Chaplain Jennifer Dill’s request. A patient wished to be baptized by full submersion as required by his faith. Sorenson responded compassionately with professionalism. He gave helpful suggestions and connected Dill with colleagues in the Physical Therapy department who could help.

Kristal Kemppainen, PT, CWS, Physical Therapy/GMH, is one of Darrin Sorenson’s colleagues who helped turn the whirlpool department in to a sanctuary for the sacrament of baptism. They ensured this fragile patient’s safety while honoring his dignity. Their kind and respectful manner contributed to an experience that was extremely meaningful for the patient and his family.

Donna Thackston, PTA, Physical Therapy/GMH, along with co-workers Darrin Sorenson and Kristal Kemppainen, demonstrated GHS’ COMPASSION standard assist patients, families and other customers.. “All three brought tears to my eyes when I saw how dedicated they were in helping make this happen,” wrote Chaplain Jennifer Dill, who nominated Thackston and her colleagues.

Megan McCrary, RN, Blood and Marrow Transplant Unit/Hematology, took time from an already hectic day to coordinate arrangements so that a patient in end-stage disease could take part in the sacrament of baptism. She and colleague Victoria Stephens provided great compassion to the patient and patient’s family.

Picture not available

Victoria Stephens, RN, 5D Oncology/GMH, also made time in her busy schedule to assist Megan McCrary in making sure that a patient could become baptized according to his wishes and in keeping with the tenets of his faith. Thanks to their kindness and compassion, the patient and his family were able to experience a meaningful ritual that offered healing and hope.

Volunteers of the Month

Ronny Dillard is the Volunteer of the Month for September. Since 2012, Dillard has logged almost 2,000 hours at Greenville Memorial Medical Campus. Known for his humor, contagious laugh and concern for patients and families, Dillard serves in the Cancer Institute one or two days a week. He also plays Santa for various patient groups. Recently, he was elected president of Greenville Memorial Medical Campus’ Auxiliary. 

April King is the Volunteer of the Month for October. Serving Greenville Memorial Hospital since 1994, she has devoted over 4,750 hours to brightening our patients’ days with her warm smile and cheerful attitude. King helps process and deliver patient mail and ecards. Also recognized as Volunteer of the Month in 2008, King is a joy to have on the Volunteer Services team.

Standard of the Month

Protect Privacy and Confidentiality
GHS takes care of people when they are at their most vulnerable. We show compassion when we practice the behavior standard Protect privacy and confidentiality.

Patients need to trust us to not only provide excellent medical care, but also safeguard their personal information. We are bound by GHS policies, along with federal and state laws, to use that information only as needed to deliver care. Here are some things we all can do to help protect privacy and confidentiality:
• Log out of your computer when you leave your desk
• Secure personal devices such as phones and tablets with a password
• Log out of GHS applications such as Citrix and Webmail

We also must be careful about what we post on social media. Following are examples of inappropriate use of social media that may violate patient privacy and/or GHS policy:
• Posting pictures where patients or patient information may be seen in the background
• Facebook postings or text messages that contain patient information or unique identifying information
• Entering comments to another person’s posted message that may include patient information

Remember, the standards of professionalism are the same online as in any other circumstance. Do not “like,” “share,” or post information or photos gained through work-related activities.

Have questions or concerns? Call the GHS Privacy Line at 797-7755.

Kudos

Angie Craig, RN, Greer Memorial Hospital, was named the GHS Uplift Coach of the Year. Craig is recognized for her dedication and commitment to helping staff in the Perioperative Unit use safe patient-lifting techniques and tools. She has provided re-training for staff, most recently following an increase in skin tears during lateral transfers.

(l-r) Pam Billings, BSN, RN, manager, GHS Employee Health; Heather Wagner, BSN, RN, UPLIFT facilitator; Angie Craig, RN; Joanna Travaglini, MSN, RN, nursing supervisor, Recovery Room, Greer Memorial Hospital 

The CT department of GHS Vascular Health Alliance has received accreditation by the American College of Radiology (ACR). This designation recognizes high practice standards for staff expertise, facility equipment, quality control procedures and quality assurance programs. Image quality and procedure evaluations are conducted by board-certified radiologists and medical physicists who are experts in the field.

Gwen Pollard, Equipped for Life™, part of GHS, was recognized by Congressman Jeff Duncan for her leadership in the Hawaiian Shirts for Deployed Military program. Pollard also received WSPA Channel 7’s Caring for the Carolina’s awards for her efforts. Gwen’s son is an infantryman who brightened the day of his fellow soldiers when he wore a Hawaiian shirt from Pollard. The shirt was such a hit that Pollard has since made it her mission to collect and send more than 2,000 Hawaiian shirts to deployed troops!

Congressman Jeff Duncan recognizes Gwen Pollard for her efforts on behalf of deployed troops.

Several GHS Cancer Institute oncologists were recognized as among the country’s top enrollers in clinical trials funded by National Cancer Institute Community Oncology Research Programs (NCORP) from August 2014-June 2017.

The following were recognized during NCORP’s annual meeting in Maryland:

  • Mark O’Rourke, MD—Top Third Highest Accruer
  • Jeffrey Giguere, MD—Platinum Award
  • Ross Michels, MD, and Britt Boleman, MD—Silver Award
  • W. Jeffery Edenfield, MD; David Grisell, DO; Jeffrey Elder, MD; and Nichole Bryant, MD—Appreciation Award

Congratulations to the entire Cancer Institute Research Team!

Over the last three years, the institute has emerged as one of the top enrollers of participants in this program. In addition to the latest treatment trials, NCORP, a national network, brings cancer prevention clinical trials and cancer care delivery research to people in their communities. In 2014, the Cancer Institute was awarded a multi-million dollar NCORP grant to conduct clinical trials and research studies aimed at improving patient outcomes and reducing health disparities.

Dr. O’Rourke is congratulated by Worta McCaskill-Stevens, MD, chief of the Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group, which oversees NCORP.

Mike Riordan, CEO for GHS, has been named to Modern Healthcare’s list of the 100 Most Influential People in Healthcare. Riordan soon will transition to the role of co-CEO of a new, not-for-profit health company being created in partnership with Palmetto Health. (Watch for updates in the next issue of The View.) The new health company aims to shape and lead the future of health care for all South Carolinians by improving the patient experience, clinical quality and access to care, and by addressing rising healthcare costs. Modern Healthcare specifically noted the change in GHS’ organizational structure in recognizing Riordan.

AROUND THE SYSTEM

Lifetime of Service

Did you know we have employees who have been with GHS for more than 50 years? Here are two who recently celebrated their 45-year anniversary: Linda Barber and Hayward Smith. Smith is a cook and Barber manages Patient Food Services at Greenville Memorial Hospital (GMH). Also pictured is GMH Administrator Ric Ransom. Congratulations to all GHS employees celebrating a milestone anniversary in 2017!

GHS, University of South Carolina Expand Partnership

GHS and the University of South Carolina (USC) are expanding their partnership to include a focus on commercialization of innovative research and technologies that could improve the health of residents in South Carolina and beyond.

Under the agreement approved by USC’s Board of Trustees in August, USC’s Office of Economic Engagement will help identify opportunities for clinicians and others at GHS’ Health Sciences Center and the USC School of Medicine Greenville to connect with industry partners, bridging the gap between leading-edge health research and the development of new patient treatment applications. Future opportunities include commercialization of a wide range of new drug therapies, medical devices and diagnostic tools.

Participation Grows in MSK Program

The GHS Musculoskeletal (MSK) Program continues to deliver low-cost, excellent patient experience and good outcomes. Through August of the 2017 plan year, 527 participants enrolled in MSK, exceeding participation during the entire 2016 plan year!

GHS partners with ATI Physical Therapy to provide this pathway-driven approach to treating neck, back, shoulder, hip and knee pain. Offered to GHS employees and adult beneficiaries covered by the GHS Health Plan, the MSK Program offers quick, convenient access to care at one of 15 ATI locations. Copay is only $20 per visit.

Of those completing the program in 2017, 80% required no additional prescription medications, imaging or doctor visits. Overall, participants experience an average 45% increase in functional improvement. Those who require more emergent care or have non-resolving symptoms receive streamlined appointments at GHS Steadman Hawkins Clinic of the Carolinas.

Call (864) 528-5755 to schedule an appointment. Questions? Contact Kelly Crocker, manager Employee Benefits, at kcrocker@ghs.org.

USC Professor Takes Part in Congressional Briefing

University of South Carolina School of Medicine Greenville’s Jennifer Trilk, PhD, recently attended a congressional briefing to make the case that lifestyle medicine be taught in all medical schools so that, upon graduation, physicians are equipped to help their patients prevent chronic diseases before they start. Click here to watch a five-minute recap of the briefing.

Enhance Your Research Skills

Clemson University’s Department of Public Health Sciences, in collaboration with GHS, offers the Clinical and Translational Research Certificate program. This graduate-level program builds research competency among GHS clinicians, research support staff and other health professionals.

To learn more or apply, go to http://hsc.ghs.org/clinical-translational-research-certificate. Questions? Contact Ron Gimbel, PhD, rgimbel@clemson.edu or David Cull, MD, dcull@ghs.org.

Plain Language Codes

As part of our continued commitment to safety and reducing harm, GHS has implemented plain language emergency codes. In case of an emergency, plain language codes will notify relevant individuals to start an immediate and appropriate response based on the system’s emergency operations plan.

Plain language codes promote transparency, increase safety and align with national initiatives. These codes are recommended by the South Carolina Hospital Association and supported by hospitals both locally and nationally. Additionally, a recent report on health literacy and patient safety by The Joint Commission recommends making plain language a “universal precaution” in all patient encounters.

In preparation for the October 1 go-live, GHS staff (employed, contracted and affiliated), students and faculty were required to complete a CBT—Plain Language for Emergency Codes—in HealthStream. This information now is part of New Employee Orientation and the online orientation curriculum.

New Services and Locations

The Family Birthplace at Patewood Opens
Select moms-to-be with low-risk pregnancies can deliver their babies at Patewood Memorial Hospital in a homelike setting with the latest OB services and highly trained staff. Call 454-2294 to arrange a tour if you are part of Greenville Ob/Gyn Associates or Piedmont OB/GYN, or visit www.ghs.org/pmhbaby.

Rheumatology Practice Relocates
Rheumatology Specialists has moved to 155-B Halton Village Circle in Greenville. The phone number remains the same, 522-4500.

Cardiology Updates
Carolina Cardiology Consultants has relocated its Simpsonville office from 719A to 227 S.E. Main St., Ste. 100. For an appointment, continue to call 455-6900.

Also, the practice has opened a new office in Clemson at 101 Chapman Hill Rd. Cardiac electrophysiology is available as well. For an appointment, call 455-6900.

Pediatric Services Expand in Spartanburg
Infectious Disease and Rheumatology services for children are offered at 249 N. Grove Medical Park Drive, Ste. 200. For an appointment, call 573-8732.

Lung Center Now in Greer
GHS Lung Center has a new office in Greer at 315 Medical Parkway, Ste. 240. The phone number is 797-9040.

Nursing Excellence

Nursing Research: Advancing Knowledge and Innovation

In 2002, GHS established a nursing research program. Today, this program exemplifies how nurses generate new knowledge, advance nursing practice, improve patient care and promote safety.

GHS nurses are active in every facet of research:

Oversight
Nurses serve as members on each GHS Institutional Review Board (IRB), where they help ensure oversight of research conducted throughout GHS. These interdisciplinary committees uphold national standards for conducting research and protect the rights and safety of human subjects enrolled in research studies.

Collaboration
As part of the Magnet® Recognition application, a detailed report of 48 months of IRB-approved studies was submitted in which GHS nurses served as primary investigators. GHS nurses collaborate and partner with academic faculty in nursing studies and interprofessional research.

Sharing New Knowledge and Innovation
Nurses share what they’ve learned and discovered through research internally and externally. For example, nurses are engaged in learning about current research through monthly presentations on research proposals.

A special research “boot camp” offers continuing education to nurses working at all levels within GHS. This nursing series takes students from clinical inquiry to developing their own investigator-initiated research study proposals. Nurses also pursue graduate education in clinical and translational research and receive academic degrees that involve conducting research.

We are extremely proud of our nurse researchers as they advance GHS’ vision to transform health care for the benefit of the people and communities we serve.

Contributor Susan Bethel, MS, RN, NE-BC, is manager of Nursing Scholarship & Research at GHS.

2017 Nursing Research Boot Camp graduates and faculty

October Service Anniversaries

40 Years
Pat Smith

35 Years
Brenda Blander
David Fisher
Sheila Greene
Jane Hart

30 Years
Lesia Childress
Sheila Dailey
Diana Gilbert
Janie Weinzettel

25 Years
Carol Bish
Jackie Cobb
Felicia Nisly

20 Years
Carla Baldeh
Delores Long
Kashmira Patel
Amy Rush
Michael Samuels
Val Smith-Byrd
Jeanne Tucker

Susan Valenti
Dannette Vandegrift

15 Years
Tracey Batson
Carrie Burns
Wendy Callahan
Teresa Henry
Norma Jeffries
Phyllis Jones
Brigitte Maffett-McKinney
Margaret Moon
Joanna O’Shields
Rebecca Peace
Brandy Porter
Brian Redmond
Lori Rogers
Michele Williamson
Pamela Willis
William R. Wilson
Heather Wright

10 Years
Emma Allen
Kristin Altman
Monica Bedoya

Alexis Breazeale
Caroline Brownlee
Karen Buchanan
Lillie Mae Chandler
David Clinkscales
Whitney Coe
Angela Cromer
Alex Fernandez Martinez
Sarah Fraser
Diana Gaitanis
Shea Garbett
Barbara Green
Shanye Hagood
Trisha Hand
Tod Hanover
Kathy Hayes
Belinda Henry
Rachel Hirt
Bobby Holladay
Brandon Hopkins
Tiffany Hughes
Stephanie Hyneman
Penny Jackson
April Johnson
Kari Ledbetter
Tatsiana Makarchyk

Kathryn McDeed
Chris McJunkin
Elizabeth Morgan
Mary Nesbitt
Kim Norris
Veronica Orten
Pam Page
Deanne Phinney
Kelly Phinney
Michelle Price
Jayne Quick
Mike Ramirez
Amy Robinson
Bee Robinson
Betty Rogers
Virginia Rogers
Denise Rollins
Abby Sellers
Kristen Shaw
Leann Smart
Daniel Smith
Jo Stover
Frances Taylor
Josh Trick
Chris Troup
Elizabeth Tyson
Semma Watt

Jane Witowski
Elaine Zix

5 Years
Shaina Adams
Bethany Arrington
Parampal Bhullar
Amber Bowdoin
Neil Bowens
Yvette Boyd-Greenlee
Sarah Burchfield
Erica Busby
Kesha Calwile
Caroline Cauthen
Jelanie Cespedes
Kim Davis-Utterback
Matthew Eison
Judy Fisher
Sabrina Galloway
Kristi Geddings
Anna Hardin
Angel Harris
Kayla Jefferson
Sherrie Johnson
Lee Love

Dana Lowe
Barrett Ludley
Valerie Mattfeld
Tara McGowan
Tonda McKenzie
Sarah McNight
Hannah Meade
Iris Miller
Renee Moore
Andrea Murphy
Carol Olesen
Roshni Patel
Wanda Ratliff
Kita Rhodes
Michela Rusu
Megan Semanski
Jan M. Smith
Rachael Suber
Brittany Swett
Mike Tucker
Charmaine Turney
Diana Ungureanu
Vu Van
Shannon Vaughn
Belinda White
Taysha Winfield

Upcoming Events

Get Your Flu Vaccine
All employees are required to take the seasonal flu vaccine by Nov. 14. Go to Plexus for more information, including dates and times when vaccines will be offered on GHS campuses.

November Town Hall Meetings
Watch the What’s Happening at GHS e-newsletter and Corporate Communication email for dates, times and locations.

Open Enrollment: Nov. 1-15
Find the 2018 Employee Benefit Summary online at www.ghs.org/employee and
www.mybensite.com/greenvillehr. The summary will be posted by Oct. 31.

Donate for the Troops!
Now through Nov. 10, support the local chapter of Blue Star Mothers by donating items for care packages that will ship to upstate soldiers serving overseas. Watch What’s Happening at GHS for details.

Run4Life 5K
Nov. 4—This 5K run and one-mile walk takes place at the Caine Halter YMCA and raises funds for the Cancer Society of Greenville County and GHS Institute for Translational Oncology Research. Visit run4lifesc.org.

Veterans Day Celebration
Nov. 10—Greenville Memorial Hospital, 11 a.m. Join us in recognizing the men and women who have served in our nation’s armed forces.

Turkey Day 8K & 5K
Nov. 23—Make plans now to walk or run in this 8K or 5K on Thanksgiving Day in downtown Greenville! Visit treesgreenville.org for more information.

Save the Date
Oconee Festival of Trees
Nov. 27-Dec. 1—This five-day festival includes luncheons, fashion shows, craft sales, tree decorating and more to benefit GHS Hospice of the Foothills. Visit ghsgiving.org to learn more.

HealthCenter Tips for Healthy Living
HealthCenter on ghs.org connects users to useful articles, podcasts, videos, events and infographics on how we can live healthier lives. Check out the A-Z Health Library to learn about a variety of health conditions.

See a full list of GHS classes and events at www.ghs.org/events.

Community Connections

UCAN Benefit Ride
On October 1, the GHS Every Woman Cycling Teams sponsored the UCAN (Upstate Communities Abilities Network) Benefit Ride. Cyclists rode 48, 39 or 25 miles to raise funds for Roger C. Peace Rehabilitation Hospital’s UCAN adaptive cycling program. Learn more about our adaptive sports activities.

Thank you to everyone who participated!

Siawn Norristown checks out the Krayon Kiosk.

Krayon Kiosk
 In September, the Krayon Kiosk opened in the waiting area at Children’s Hospital Outpatient Center. This fun center, which includes an iPad with multiple apps that children can use to express their creativity, was made possible by the staff at Patewood Café Express. Staff members donated their tips to the Virtual Toy Drive, a GHS Office of Philanthropy & Partnership offering, to make this project happen.

GHS Orthopaedic Surgery: Past to Future
The newest exhibit at GHS History Center follows the evolution of orthopaedic surgery at GHS, growth and development of the Orthopaedic Surgery academic program, and the program’s continuing influence in advancing health care for  generations.

The GHS History Center is located in the
Greenville Memorial Hospital atrium.

Joy of Giving
The Joy of Giving Program gives GHS employees an opportunity to help a GHS family experiencing severe financial distress by buying gifts for children who would otherwise not receive them. Individuals and groups may go to the Joy of Giving website on Plexus between November 7 and December 8 to select families to sponsor. Learn more at https://marketing.ghs.org/joyofgiving/. Questions? Email joyofgiving@ghs.org

To report news, email ghsnews@ghs.org

Meredith McGinnis, Editor

Connect with us. Learn what’s going on at GHS.
Access The View on the Employee Access page at ghs.org
and the News and Communication page on Plexus